Teen missing from treatment program located

A 14-year-old boy who left without permission from a residential treatment program in unincorporated San Mateo County near Redwood City early Monday morning was found in Burlingame around 3 p.m. Tuesday, according to the sheriff's office.

The boy and another 15-year-old boy, who are both on juvenile probation, left without permission from the Canyon Oaks Youth Center at 400 Edmonds Road at about 12:30 a.m., the sheriff's office reported.

About 20 minutes after they were reported missing, a sheriff's deputy spotted both boys at Cordilleras and Bennett roads, the sheriff's office said. The 15-year-old boy was taken into custody for violation of probation and transported to the Youth Services Center.

The 14-year-old fled and had not been located after an extensive search of the area, according to the sheriff's office. Residents were alerted of the incident by the county alert and phone notification systems.

The teen was taken into custody today after the sheriff's office received a tip that he might be in the Burlingame area, Sgt. Linda Gibbons said. Sheriff's detectives found him around 3 p.m. near the corner of California Avenue and North Road.

The boy was arrested for violation of probation and taken to the Youth Services Center, Gibbons said.

The Canyon Oaks Youth Center is operated by the San Mateo County Health Department's Behavioral Health and Recovery Services.

Health department spokeswoman Beverly Thames said the facility is an unlocked group home that accepts referrals from juvenile probation as well as the county's human services agency and the school system.

The center serves co-ed teens 12 to 17 years old who are not being held on criminal charges, according to the sheriff's office.

Bay Area NewsescapeLocalSheriff

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