Sweep of salons nails violators

A surprise sweep of San Francisco beauty salons by the state this weekend uncovered violations in 16 out of 19 of the businesses inspected.

Five establishments were written up because of visible unsanitary conditions and one salon was suspended due to its health practices as a result of the sweep, which was aimed at uncovering unlicensed workers and businesses and conducted by the California Department of Consumer Affairs.

Six businesses were flagged for failing to posses proper licenses, and 11 individual workers were cited for lacking appropriate training certificates — a lack of qualification that could result in significant health problems for consumers, according to Kristy Underwood of the CDCA.

“Workers need a certain amount of training so they can professionally evaluate skin,” Underwood said.

One person died in Santa Clara County last year after being subjected to a disease-ridden footbath at a spa, according to Richard Hedges of the CDCA.

Each salon owner without a proper business license — which costs $50 — must pay a $1,000 fine, and each individual without proper accreditation must pay a $1,000 fine. The 16 San Francisco salons guilty of violations were issued $42,400 in fines.

The suspended San Francisco salon — Mi Mi, at 4712 Mission St. — had seven violations, according to the CDCA report. Although it can still keep practicing, the salon is subject to quarterly inspections and must pay a still-to-be-determined amount in fines, according to Kevin Flanagan of the CDCA.

wreisman@examiner.com

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