Suspect fatally shot by police ID’d as 26-year-old man

The medical examiner’s office has identified the stabbing suspect fatally shot by San Francisco police Wednesday as 26-year-old city resident Mario Woods.

Officers found Woods in the 2900 block of Keith Street, between Gilman and LeConte avenues, around 4:35 p.m. after learning of a stabbing in the area earlier that afternoon, according to authorities. Woods was reportedly armed with the kitchen knife police believe was used in the stabbing.

The officers convened and told the suspect to drop his weapon, Police Chief Greg Suhr said. Witnesses on a nearby bus reportedly confirmed the exchange to police.

Police fired and struck the man several times with beanbags while moving away from him, at one point knocking him to the ground, Suhr said. But when an officer tried to cut off the man’s path, and the man moved toward him carrying the knife, five officers opened fire, killing him. Police gave the suspect CPR before paramedics arrived, but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

Chief Medical Examiner Michael Hunter is conducting an autopsy to determine the suspect’s exact cause of death, according to the medical examiner’s office.

Witness video posted online to Instagram appears to show the moments before the fatal shooting when several police officers surrounded the man on a Third Street sidewalk near Gilman Avenue around 4:35 p.m.

The camera’s view is obscured when police open fire, and the barrage of gunshots can only be heard.

About 45 minutes before the police shooting, a victim who had been stabbed in the shoulder walked into San Francisco General Hospital and described his assailant. The victim is expected to survive.

The victim, who was stabbed near Third Street and Le Conte Avenue, about six blocks away from the fatal shooting, described the alleged stabber as “still being in the area,” Suhr said. After a witness also confirmed the man was nearby, Bayview officers set up a perimeter around 4:20 p.m., and shortly after located the suspect.

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