Supreme Court to weigh impact of disability law on police

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

The Supreme Court will consider whether police must comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act when confronting armed or violent suspects who are mentally ill.

The justices said Tuesday they will hear an appeal from the City and County of San Francisco arguing that disability laws do not apply to officers facing violent circumstances.

The case arose when two San Francisco police officers checked on Teresa Sheehan, a woman with a history of mental health problems. She pulled a knife and the officers ended up shooting her.

A federal district court rejected Sheehan's claims that the officers and the city violated disability laws and entered her room without a valid search warrant. But an appeals court reversed, saying the officers should face a trial on both issues.Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsSan Francisco Police DepartmentTeresa SheehanUS Supreme Court

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