Supreme Court to weigh fate of DACA program

Supreme Court to weigh fate of DACA program

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments Tuesday on whether it should preserve the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protecting undocumented young immigrants from deportation.

The court will hear the government’s appeal of preliminary injunctions by three federal judges in San Francisco, New York and Washington, D.C., that blocked a plan by the administration of President Donald Trump to end the program, known as DACA.

A decision is expected by the close of the court’s term at the end of June.

The DACA program currently protects nearly 700,000 young people, of whom nearly 200,000 live in California, according to state Attorney General Xavier Becerra. In the San Francisco case before the high court, U.S. District Judge William Alsup issued an injunction last year in a total of five lawsuits filed by the University of California, the state of California, the city of San Jose, Santa Clara County and six individuals.

The DACA program was established by President Barack Obama in 2012 and the Trump administration announced plans to wind it down in September 2017.

California and other plaintiffs in the lawsuits contend the decision to end DACA was “arbitrary and capricious,” made without a reasoned explanation in violation of a federal administrative procedure law.

The U.S. Department of Justice contends the program was illegal and that courts don’t have the authority to review the administration’s decision to terminate it.

Julia Cheever, Bay City News

Bay Area Newssan francisco news

Just Posted

The Hotel Whitcomb on Market Street was one of many hotels that took in homeless people as part of The City’s shelter-in-place hotel program during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Closing hotels could disconnect hundreds from critical health care services

‘That baseline of humanity and dignity goes a long way’

Pachama, a Bay Area startup, is using technology to study forests and harness the carbon-consuming power of trees. (Courtesy Agustina Perretta/Pachama)
Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

San Francisco supervisors are considering plans to replace trash cans — a “Renaissance” garbage can is pictured on Market Street — with pricey, unnecessary upgrades. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco must end ridiculous and expensive quest for ‘pretty’ trash cans

SF’s unique and pricey garbage bins a dream of disgraced former Public Works director

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

Most Read