Supes to vote on anti-sponsorship resolution for bridge

Kiosks and signs on and around the Golden Gate Bridge may remain free of corporate clutter if the San Francisco Board of Supervisors today passes a resolution opposing corporate sponsorship of the bridge.

The Golden Gate Bridge Highway and Transportation District is presenting the Golden Gate Bridge Partnership Program as a way to close the $80 million shortfall of funds in the next five years, according to the district's Web site. The district is investigating the possibility of having corporate sponsorship to help pay for bridge maintenance and general upkeep.

The resolution opposing the corporate sponsorship, headed by Supervisor Jake McGoldrick, urges the district board of directors to oppose the plan. The resolution calls the bridge one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World, and claims that corporate advertising will degrade and ruin people's experience of the landmark bridge.

The resolution also references Proposition G, which authorized the City and County of San Francisco to amend city law to prevent any new general advertising signs from being erected on private property. Proposition G was passed by the voters of San Francisco in 2002.

According to the district, corporate sponsorship will help to decrease the deficit and help pay annual upkeep of the bridge. Corporate logos will be placed on a variety of advertisements and signs, but will not be placed on the actual span of the bridge, nor will the sponsorship include naming rights of the bridge.

To see detailed information about the partnership plan, visit the district's Web site at http://goldengate.org/news/PartnershipProgram.php.  

The board of supervisors will vote on the resolution during its regularly scheduled meeting at 2 p.m. in City Hall. If the resolution passes it will be forwarded to Mayor Gavin Newsom and the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District Board of Directors.

— Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Mayor London Breed speaks at the grand opening of the Bayview Essential Services Hub at the Southeast Community Facility on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco enters red COVID tier, indoor dining to resume

San Francisco will allow indoor dining and other activities to resume Wednesday… Continue reading

Cities including San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley are calling for large grocery and drug store chains to pay employees hazard pay for working during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shutterstock)
SF proposes $5 hazard pay law for grocery, drug store workers

San Francisco may soon join the growing number of cities requiring large… Continue reading

Hikers walk along a closed stretch of Twin Peaks Boulevard on Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA board to vote on future of Twin Peaks Boulevard

The proposal would keep Burnett Avenue gate closed to vehicles, open Portola Drive

Kindergarten teacher Jennifer Klein collects crayons from students in the classroom at Lupine Hill Elementary School on Monday, Nov. 9, 2020 in Calabasas, California. (Al Seib/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Newsom, legislators strike deal to reopen California schools

Taryn Luna and John Myers Los Angeles Times Gov. Gavin Newsom and… Continue reading

A sign about proposed development of the bluff at Thornton State Beach in Daly City on Friday, Feb. 26, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Retreat center proposed at popular state beach

Daly City residents oppose construction on ocean bluffs

Most Read