Supes shoot down Newsom’s veto

Mayor Gavin Newsom’s veto of legislation changing the sanctuary policy was soundly defeated Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors in an 8-3 vote.

Supervisor David Campos, who introduced the legislation, voted to overturn the veto along with Supervisors John Avalos, Chris Daly, David Chiu, Bevan Dufty, Sophie Maxwell, Eric Mar and Ross Mirkarimi.

The legislation has changed The City’s sanctuary policy to prohibit city officials from reporting undocumented youths arrested on felonies to federal authorities for possible deportation. Under the law, they can only be reported if they are convicted of a felony or charged as an adult. It’s estimated that 160 youths were reported to ICE since the policy change in July 2008. Newsom has said he would not enforce the law since it conflicts with federal law. The head of the city’s probation officers’ union has also said the department will not enforce the law. Newsom also said the change would prompt lawsuits and put the city's entire sanctuary policy in jeopardy.

“Do the right thing and implement this policy,” Campos said during the meeting, directing. “I would ask the mayor, respectfully to please work with us, to please follow the laws that are dully enacted by this board.”

Supervisors Carmen Chu, Sean Elsbernd and Michela Alioto-Pier supported the veto.

It is the first time the new makeup of the Board of Supervisors were able to band together to override a mayoral veto as of January.
 

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