Supes lose time with city attorney

If it seems like the supervisors are not as active as they have been in the past when it comes to proposing significant policy changes, there could be good reason. For one, The City’s resources are limited, with the more than $500 million deficit that had to be closed at the start of the fiscal year, and there’s another deficit of more than $300 million projected for next fiscal year.

Add to that the decision by City Attorney Dennis Herrera — — as a result of budget cuts — to reduce the number of hours supervisors can use his legal time in drafting legislation for them to introduce. The hours were cut from 500 to 400, a 20 percent reduction.

Supervisors are able to introduce legislation by having the city attorney draft legislation. The city attorney also offers supervisors legal advice surrounding possible policy changes.

Bay Area NewsCity AttorneyDennis HerreraGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsUnder the Dome

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