Supes could rule this year on landmark proposal for North Beach library

The Board of Supervisors could decide later this year whether the North Beach branch library is a city landmark, which could help protect the building from demolition plans.

The City’s Historic Preservation Commission on Sept. 1 recommended, by a 4-3 vote, that city leaders rule that the building is a landmark.

The vote conflicted with a Planning Department finding that the building has historical significance but should not be listed as a landmark.

The 1950s-era building is planned to be torn down to make way for new parkland. A larger replacement library is planned on a nearby triangular parking lot.

The Planning Department plans this week to send paperwork to the Board of Supervisors related to the proposal to list the building as a landmark, according to historic preservation official Tim Frye.

Hearings regarding the proposal could be held later this year by the Land Use & Economic Development Committee and then by the full Board of Supervisors.

Legislation to designate the building as a landmark would need to wait at least 30 days after it’s introduced at the Board of Supervisors before the first hearing could be scheduled.

If the library is designated as a landmark, supervisors could still opt to forge ahead with the replacement project and tear down the existing branch.

An Oct. 7 Planning Commission hearing is scheduled to discuss a draft environmental impact report dealing with the replacement plan, according to Planning Department legislative affairs analyst AnMarie Rodgers.

Once the report is finalized and certified, the Board of Supervisors will decide whether to proceed with the replacement project.

 

Bay Area NewsBoard of SupervisorsGovernment & PoliticsNorth BeachPoliticsUnder the Dome

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

BART Ambassadors are being called on to assist riders in social situations that don’t require police force. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Unarmed BART ambassadors program formalized with a focus on community service

Public safety and police reform are key elements in campaigns of Board members Dufty and Simon

On Oct. 13, people lined up to vote early for the presidential election in Southlake, Texas. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>
<ins></ins>
Five things to watch for in the run-up to Nov. 3

Down-ballot races, as much as the presidency, will determine the future course of this nation

WeChat (Shutterstock)
U.S. District Court denies Trump request to shutdown WeChat app

A federal judge in San Francisco denied a request by the U.S.… Continue reading

School board members Gabriela Lopez (left) and Alison Collins (right) say they have been the subject of frequent hateful, racist and sexist attacks during their time on the school board. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F Examiner)
Angered by Lowell decision, SFUSD grad targets school board members with violent imagery

Facebook page depicts two women of color on board with swastikas and x-marks on their faces

Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer, a former school board member, said it was ‘ridiculous’ that the school district did not yet have a plan to reopen. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Supervisors demand SFUSD set a timeline for reopening

Pressure grows on district to resume in-person learning as The City’s COVID-19 case count goes down

Most Read