Supes could rule this year on landmark proposal for North Beach library

The Board of Supervisors could decide later this year whether the North Beach branch library is a city landmark, which could help protect the building from demolition plans.

The City’s Historic Preservation Commission on Sept. 1 recommended, by a 4-3 vote, that city leaders rule that the building is a landmark.

The vote conflicted with a Planning Department finding that the building has historical significance but should not be listed as a landmark.

The 1950s-era building is planned to be torn down to make way for new parkland. A larger replacement library is planned on a nearby triangular parking lot.

The Planning Department plans this week to send paperwork to the Board of Supervisors related to the proposal to list the building as a landmark, according to historic preservation official Tim Frye.

Hearings regarding the proposal could be held later this year by the Land Use & Economic Development Committee and then by the full Board of Supervisors.

Legislation to designate the building as a landmark would need to wait at least 30 days after it’s introduced at the Board of Supervisors before the first hearing could be scheduled.

If the library is designated as a landmark, supervisors could still opt to forge ahead with the replacement project and tear down the existing branch.

An Oct. 7 Planning Commission hearing is scheduled to discuss a draft environmental impact report dealing with the replacement plan, according to Planning Department legislative affairs analyst AnMarie Rodgers.

Once the report is finalized and certified, the Board of Supervisors will decide whether to proceed with the replacement project.

 

Bay Area NewsBoard of SupervisorsGovernment & PoliticsNorth BeachPoliticsUnder the Dome

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