Supes asked to keep the partying under control

Board of Supervisors members are partying more than ever at City Hall in their offices, which is causing problems for building management.

Some supervisors, such as Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi, hold what are known as art parties in their offices on a regular basis. Supervisor Chris Daly once even tended bar in his office as a fundraiser.

The increase in the festivities, however, has prompted the building manager to shoot off a memo to the supervisors Wednesday seeking to bring the partying under control by establishing new guidelines.

“The use of Supervisors’ offices for private parties has increased significantly in size and frequency over the last several years,” the Sept. 28 memo said. “This memorandum seeks to establish guidelines to better manage such parties/community events, particularly as they impact paid events and standard duties for building staff at City Hall.”

The new guidelines put limits on the number of attendees, restrict alcohol use and set noise levels.

City Hall Building Manager Rob Reiter said in the memo that “these guidelines are intended to limit the financial and physical impact to City Hall events, the Sheriff’s Department, and the City Hall Building Management staff, while still affording the supervisors the ability to conduct private parties and community events in their offices or the board conference room.”

Moving forward, supervisors can only hold parties in their personal offices with fewer than 30 attendees, and they must notify building management within 72 hours of a planned party as well as the sheriff’s department to ensure adequate security.

Any music or other noise coming from the parties “shall be maintained at a level adequate so as not to cause a disruption to building operations or other building occupants,” and “alcohol use shall be confined to each supervisor’s office.”

The memo also reminds the supervisors that smoking is not allowed anywhere inside of City Hall or on the outside balconies.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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