Occupy SF’s tent city at Justin Herman Plaza (Examiner file photo)Occupy SF’s tent city at Justin Herman Plaza (Examiner file photo)

Occupy SF’s tent city at Justin Herman Plaza (Examiner file photo)Occupy SF’s tent city at Justin Herman Plaza (Examiner file photo)

Supervisors vote to support Occupy SF camp at Justin Herman Plaza

A resolution imploring The City to be flexible with Occupy SF’s tent city at Justin Herman Plaza was passed by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday.

The resolution introduced by Supervisor John Avalos also discourages San Francisco police from using “force to dislodge the Occupy SF demonstrators.” During discussion of the item, supervisors mentioned the violent raid on the Occupy Oakland movement Oct. 25 and the near-raid that shook up the San Francisco camp the next night.

Supervisor Scott Wiener noted that the Occupy Oakland raid was “abhorrent” and heavy-handed, but introduced an amendment that would allow San Francisco police to use force under clear public safety threats. Wiener was concerned that the resolution – which is ultimately non-binding – would “hamstring” police in an emergency situation.

“We all know things can change on a dime,” Wiener said.

The amendment passed 6-5 and the resolution passed with an 8-3 supermajority, with supervisors Mark Farrell, Carmen Chu and Sean Elsbernd dissenting. Farrell said allowing Occupy SF members to camp in a public park would set a bad precedent.

Occupy SF’s camp has twice been raided in San Francisco, once on Oct. 6 when it was based primarily outside the Federal Reserve Bank on Market Street and again on Oct. 16 at Justin Herman Plaza.

dschreiber@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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