Attorney Mary Miles addresses the Board of Supervisors during a Feb. 4, 2020 hearing on an appeal of the Page Street Bikeway pilot project. (Corey Browning/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Attorney Mary Miles addresses the Board of Supervisors during a Feb. 4, 2020 hearing on an appeal of the Page Street Bikeway pilot project. (Corey Browning/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Supervisors reject Page Street Bikeway appeal

The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to move forward with plans to build the Page Street Bikeway Pilot despite an appeal requesting an environmental impact review.

The 12-month pilot is designed to reduce vehicle traffic on Page Street and increase safety for cyclists, pedestrians and those at the nearby John Muir Elementary School. But according to an appeal filed by Rob Anderson and attorney Mary Miles—a duo somewhat notorious for their advocacy against bike lanes —the project violates the California Environmental Quality Act by not first conducting an environmental impact review.

Their appeal states that the project will have significant impacts and is not designed to collect data, and therefore is not eligible for a Class 6 Categorical Exemption as The City determined.

“Why are you really doing this? Only the Bicycle Coalition can tell you that,” Miles said during Tuesday’s meeting. “They want Page Street for their own private use.”

The board voted unanimously to reject the appeal.

The project will eliminate the eastbound vehicle lane between Octavia Boulevard and Laguna Street and add turn restrictions along and onto Page Street to block drivers from using the street to access the U.S Highway 101 onramp.

The eastbound bike lane on Page Street between Octavia Boulevard and Laguna Street will become protected and the same portion of street westbound will gain a bike lane.

Neighbors and frequent Page Street travelers say the street has become a congested and dangerous onramp to the Octavia Boulevard highway entrance.

“It becomes very dangerous, very loud with the horn honking, the yelling from the drivers,” said David Robinson who lives on the portion of Page Street slated to lose a lane. “It happens day and night.”

Roughly 5400 cars travel Page Street east of Webster Street daily, and during peak hours, 1.2 times as many bikes travel east on Page Street as cars, according to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.

One block over 30,000 drivers travel Oak Street’s three eastbound lanes daily.

“We hope people will shift over and stay on the arterial routes,” said SFMTA planner Mark Dreger.

The project, which was originally approved by the SFMTA in November, will be built with temporary materials like signage, paint and plastic poles and remain in place for 12 months for “data collection, outreach, and evaluation,” according to the SFMTA.

At the end of the pilot period, the project will be subject to an environmental impact review and and head for final approval from the SFMTA board.

Miles and Anderson could respond to the Board of Supervisors decision with a lawsuit, which would delay the project. In 2005 the pair filed a lawsuit that successfully halted bicycle infrastructure projects for years using a similar argument, getting a judge to grant a temporary injunction against any bike-related improvements that wasn’t lifted until 2010.Bay Area Newsedition-monsan francisco newsTransit

Just Posted

A large crack winds its way up a sidewalk along China Basin Street in Mission Bay on Friday, Sept. 24, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco’s sinking sidewalks: Is climate change to blame?

‘In the last couple months, it’s been a noticeable change’

For years, Facebook employees have identified serious harms and proposed potential fixes. CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg have rejected the remedies, causing whisteblowers to multiple. (Eric Thayer/The New York Times)
Facebook’s problems at the top: Social media giant is not listening to whistleblowers

Whistleblowers multiply, but Zuckerberg and Sandberg don’t heed their warnings

Maria Jimenez swabs her 7-year-old daughter Glendy Perez for a COVID-19 test at Canal Alliance in San Rafael on Sept. 25. (Penni Gladstone/CalMatters)
Rapid COVID-19 tests in short supply in California

‘The U.S. gets a D- when it comes to testing’

Niners quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo led a late-game comeback against the Packers, but San Francisco lost, 30-28, on a late field goal. (Courtesy of San Francisco 49ers)
The Packers beat the Niners in a heartbreaker: Don’t panic

San Francisco is no better and no worse than you thought they were.

A new ruling will thwart the growth of solar installation companies like Luminalt, which was founded in an Outer Sunset garage and is majority woman owned. (Philip Cheung, New York Times)
A threat to California’s solar future and diverse employment pathways

A new ruling creates barriers to entering the clean energy workforce

Most Read