Attorney Mary Miles addresses the Board of Supervisors during a Feb. 4, 2020 hearing on an appeal of the Page Street Bikeway pilot project. (Corey Browning/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Attorney Mary Miles addresses the Board of Supervisors during a Feb. 4, 2020 hearing on an appeal of the Page Street Bikeway pilot project. (Corey Browning/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Supervisors reject Page Street Bikeway appeal

The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to move forward with plans to build the Page Street Bikeway Pilot despite an appeal requesting an environmental impact review.

The 12-month pilot is designed to reduce vehicle traffic on Page Street and increase safety for cyclists, pedestrians and those at the nearby John Muir Elementary School. But according to an appeal filed by Rob Anderson and attorney Mary Miles—a duo somewhat notorious for their advocacy against bike lanes —the project violates the California Environmental Quality Act by not first conducting an environmental impact review.

Their appeal states that the project will have significant impacts and is not designed to collect data, and therefore is not eligible for a Class 6 Categorical Exemption as The City determined.

“Why are you really doing this? Only the Bicycle Coalition can tell you that,” Miles said during Tuesday’s meeting. “They want Page Street for their own private use.”

The board voted unanimously to reject the appeal.

The project will eliminate the eastbound vehicle lane between Octavia Boulevard and Laguna Street and add turn restrictions along and onto Page Street to block drivers from using the street to access the U.S Highway 101 onramp.

The eastbound bike lane on Page Street between Octavia Boulevard and Laguna Street will become protected and the same portion of street westbound will gain a bike lane.

Neighbors and frequent Page Street travelers say the street has become a congested and dangerous onramp to the Octavia Boulevard highway entrance.

“It becomes very dangerous, very loud with the horn honking, the yelling from the drivers,” said David Robinson who lives on the portion of Page Street slated to lose a lane. “It happens day and night.”

Roughly 5400 cars travel Page Street east of Webster Street daily, and during peak hours, 1.2 times as many bikes travel east on Page Street as cars, according to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency.

One block over 30,000 drivers travel Oak Street’s three eastbound lanes daily.

“We hope people will shift over and stay on the arterial routes,” said SFMTA planner Mark Dreger.

The project, which was originally approved by the SFMTA in November, will be built with temporary materials like signage, paint and plastic poles and remain in place for 12 months for “data collection, outreach, and evaluation,” according to the SFMTA.

At the end of the pilot period, the project will be subject to an environmental impact review and and head for final approval from the SFMTA board.

Miles and Anderson could respond to the Board of Supervisors decision with a lawsuit, which would delay the project. In 2005 the pair filed a lawsuit that successfully halted bicycle infrastructure projects for years using a similar argument, getting a judge to grant a temporary injunction against any bike-related improvements that wasn’t lifted until 2010.Bay Area Newsedition-monsan francisco newsTransit

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