Supervisor Mar opposes Ocean Beach bonfire permit fee

San Francisco is going on record opposing a permit fee for Ocean Beach bonfires and a four-month prohibition — both of which are proposed by the National Park Service.

For years, supporters of the long-storied tradition of setting fires at Ocean Beach have engaged in a tense debate with the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which oversees the beach for the National Park Service, which has threatened to ban the practice.

Proposed regulations drew opposition Thursday from the Board of Supervisors Public Safety and Neighborhood Services Committee. The committee approved a resolution introduced by Supervisor Eric Mar that opposes the permit fee for fire rings “as it limits access and creates a financial barrier that will adversely impact the equitable nature of Ocean Beach recreation experience.”

Under the proposed regulations, anyone wishing to have a fire at Ocean Beach would need a $35 single-use permit for one of the provided fire rings. Fires would not be allowed on Ocean Beach from the first day in November to the last day in February.

Mar says The City pays for cleanup related to the fires and that the safety concerns are overblown.

The full board will vote on the resolution Dec. 1. It is unbinding, but sends a message to the National Park Service.

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Diners at Teeth, a bar in the Mission District, on July 9, 2021. Teeth began using digital menus based on QR code technology in August. (Ulysses Ortega/The New York Times)
The football stadium at UC Berkeley, on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. George Kliavkoff, a former top executive at MGM Resorts International, took over the conference at the start of the month. (Jim Wilson/The New York Times)
What’s Ahead for the Pac-12? New commissioner weighs in

‘Every decision we make is up for discussion. There are no sacred cows.’

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

As the world reeled, tech titans supplied the tools that made life and work possible. Now the companies are awash in money and questions about what it means to win amid so much loss. (Nicolas Ortega/The New York Times)
How tech won the pandemic and now may never lose

By David Streitfeld New York Times In April 2020, with 2,000 Americans… Continue reading

Most Read