Supervisor hopes to avoid November runoff

Incumbent county Supervisor Rich Gordon hopes to avoid a November runoff for re-election by garnering more than half the votes in the June 6 election, a strategy he has pushed by outspending his closest competitor five times over.

Gordon, who has served on the Board of Supervisors since 1997, is being challenged by Jo Chamberlain and Jack Hickey for the District 3 nonpartisan supervisorial seat. If none of the candidates receives more than 50 percent of the vote a runoff will be held in November, the possibility of which tantalizes both Chamberlain and Hickey.

District 3 includes unincorporated San Mateo County.

Gordon, who raised and spent $120,000 in his first campaign, described his current fundraising for the June 6 election as tempered. “I have tried not to do overkill on the campaign, but concentrated on what I think is necessary to get elected,” Gordon said.

Gordon raised about $36,000 from March 18 to May 20, the most recent fundraising records show. He has received contributions from fellow supervisors, including Jerry Hill, former Assemblyman Ted Lempert and several county labor unions. He spent about $15,000 during the current reporting period, primarily on mailers, records show.

Chamberlain, a Green Party activist, raised nearly $3,000 from March to May, for a total of about $6,500 this calendar year. That’s more than enough to get her message, in the form of a candidate’s statement, out to voters in the voter guide on the sample ballot, which was her goal. “I am doing a little better than I expected and it’s because the people who support me are very generous and support the principles I represent,” Chamberlain said.

Chamberlain, who supports publicly funded elections, has refused to accept donations from companies or corporations to “avoid the appearance or the reality of being influenced by money.” Her contributions have come primarily in increments of $100 from individuals.

Hickey, a Libertarian Party member, is banking on his candidate’s statement in the sample ballot to convince voters. Hickey, who sits on the Sequoia Health Care District Board and who ran for supervisor four years ago, raised $500 from March to May, for a total of $1,100. To date he has spent about $250 on his campaign.

He didn’t do any advertising from March to May, records show. Hickey couldn’t be reached for comment before press time.

ecarpenter@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

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