Supervisor Eric Mar considers increased chain store restrictions

San Francisco has restrictions on chain stores that have been modified over the years both by voters and the Board of Supervisors. Now, Supervisor Eric Mar is examining how they are working and if there is a need for increased controls.

On Tuesday, Mar requested a Dec. 5 board committee hearing as “an important first step in quantifying the impact of formula retail [businesses with more than 11 locations nationwide] in San Francisco, but also beginning to craft a rational response to help revitalize our ailing local economy and our neighborhoods.”

At this point, it’s unclear what exactly that means, although Mar has expressed some concerns that banks are not subject to the same restrictions as other chain stores.

“I am concerned about the many ways corporate chain stores threaten the well-being and quality of life of our community,” Mar said. “With two Target stores scheduled to open and now reports of Walmart’s intent to expand here too, I’m calling for a hearing because I want to make sure the public is properly informed about the potential risks so that we can take appropriate action to protect our local businesses, neighborhoods and economy.”

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