Sun shines on Sunset corners in S.F.

Two of the Sunset district’s busiest intersections — where neighbors say near collisions between pedestrians and Muni metro trains are common occurrences — will receive long-awaited upgrades to increase safety and calm traffic.

A $250,000 project to install train-detection systems and countdown signals at the intersections at Ninth Avenue and Irving and Judah streets is in the works after neighborhood residents, pedestrian advocates and Muni officials raised concerns about dangerous conditions. The detection systems would provide exclusive train signals that would separate when trains, pedestrians and drivers cross the intersections.

The intersections serve high volumes of pedestrians, cars and transit vehicles and are home to a variety of restaurants, shops and bars at the heart of the Inner Sunset shopping district. The N-Judah — The City’s most heavily used metro train — travels through both intersections.

At a green light, pedestrians, drivers and Muni trains cross the intersections simultaneously. Oftentimes, pedestrians will hop in front of the trains without realizing train operators also have the right of way.

“I’ve seen a lot of near misses with seniors, the disabled, kids, cars — pedestrians don’t always see the train coming, and the train has to ring the bell or the horn,” said Greg Dewar, a San Francisco resident who blogs about Muni and the N-Judah. “If you separated pedestrians from traffic, at the very least you wouldn’t have the possibility of a train hitting a pedestrian.”

Oakland resident Joe Cohen, who used to live near Ninth Avenue and Irving Street, was visiting the neighborhood Wednesday. He saw an elderly woman slowly cross the intersection with a train advancing close behind her, waiting to turn.

“They compete,” he said. “Which comes first?”

The San Francisco County Transportation Authority recently awarded Muni $60,000 in Proposition K funds to begin the planning and conceptual engineering phase of the project. Pedestrians will have to sit tight for improvements, however, as the project is expected to stretch during the next year or two, according to reports from the authority.

arocha@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Some people are concerned that University of California, San Francisco’s expansion at its Parnassus campus could cause an undesirable increase in the number of riders on Muni’s N-Judah line.<ins></ins>
Will UCSF’s $20 million pledge to SFMTA offset traffic woes?

An even more crowded N-Judah plus increased congestion ahead cause concern

A health care worker receives one of the first COVID-19 vaccine doses at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital on Tuesday Dec. 15, 2020. (Courtesy SFgov)
SF to open three large sites for COVID-19 vaccinations

Breed: ‘We need more doses. We are asking for more doses’

San Jose Sharks (pictured Feb. 15, 2020 vs. Minnesota Wild at Xcel Energy Center) open the season on Monday against the St. Louis Blues in St. Louis. (Tribune News Service archive)
This week in Bay Area sports

A look at the upcoming major Bay Area sports events (schedules subject… Continue reading

Tongo Eisen-Martin, a Bernal Heights resident, named San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Tongo Eisen-Martin becomes San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate

Bernal Heights resident Tongo Eisen-Martin has become San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate.… Continue reading

Homeless people's tents can be seen on Golden Gate Avenue in the Tenderloin on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 16, 2020. (Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong/S.F. Examiner)
Statewide business tax could bring new funds to combat homelessness

San Francisco could get more than $100 million a year for housing, rental assistance, shelter beds

Most Read