Suicide gun tied to Visitacion Valley murder

A U.S. Postal Service employee apparently used the same gun to kill himself in Livermore Wednesday as the gun used in the execution-style murder of a U.S. Postal Service supervisor in San Francisco on Tuesday morning.

San Francisco police spokesman Sgt. Neville Gittens said ballistics tests had matched the gun Julius Tartt, 39, used in his suicide to the one used to shoot Genevieve Paez, 53, as she left her Visitacion Valley home for work Tuesday morning.

Paez, a post office customer service supervisor and a mother of four, was apparently getting into her silver sport utility vehicle just before

6 a.m. to head to the post office at 180 Napoleon St. when she was shot.

Police were not called to the scene until just before 7 a.m., nearly an hour after the incident.

Tartt was found dead Wednesday afternoon off Bluebell Drive in Livermore. His death is being treated as an apparent suicide, according to the Alameda County Coroner’s Office.

Tartt worked as a postal carrier at the Napoleon Street branch, according to police.

Gittens said Paez had apparently disciplined Tartt for an incident that happened in October.

Comments on an Internet Web site for postal employees that posted the story have indicated that Paez and Tartt had some problems in their working relationship. More than 60 comments have been posted on www.postalreporter.com.

Some of the comments suggest tense relations exist between supervisors and mail carriers throughout the U.S. Postal Service. Other comments express sympathy for Paez’s family.

“She suspended him for a week [for] coming drunk to work. That might be it. She sometimes pushed people too [hard] I heard,” a poster with the handle So Sad wrote on the site Thursday.

A post office spokesman did not return calls for comment. Employees at the Napoleon branch also refused to comment.

amartin@examiner.com

Wire services contributed to this story

Bay Area NewsLocal

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