Mike Koozmin/SF ExaminerSFPD says a focus on targeting violent crime means less time spent writing citations.

Mike Koozmin/SF ExaminerSFPD says a focus on targeting violent crime means less time spent writing citations.

Study: SF, Oakland among cities driving less

A national study released earlier this month indicates that Americans’ transportation habits since the mid-2000s have veered toward less driving, and San Francisco and Oakland are moving in that direction in every category.

The average American drives 7.6 percent fewer miles today than when per-capita driving peaked in 2004, according to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group’s Transportation in Transition report. The report drew on data from the Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration and Census Bureau.

San Francisco and Oakland ranked third among urban areas in the nation in biking to work, with a 0.6 percent increase, and fifth in proportion of workers who commuted by car from 2000 to 2007-11, with a 3.9 percent decrease. The two cities ranked 18th with an 8.3 percent drop in vehicle miles traveled per capita from 2006 to 2011, and 55th with a 1.6 percent increase in passenger miles traveled by transit per capita from 2005 to 2011.

While Bay Area households with no vehicles increased 1 percent, there was a 0.8 percent decrease in households with two or more vehicles from 2006 to 2011.

“One of the things that the Bay Area has to offer is a kind of wraparound assortment of alternatives to car ownership. There’s not just the transit system, there’s bike share and carshare and good apps,” said U.S. PIRG senior analyst Phineas Baxandall. “The City has been a leader but there’s a lot more that they could do.”

The overall decrease in car usage, Baxandall added, can be attributed only in part to the recession because the study began a few years before the height of the economic crisis and concluded during its recovery.

Ed Reiskin, transportation director of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, said in a statement: “The more we invest, the more we can achieve growth and economic vitality in cities like San Francisco.”Bay Area NewsFederal Highway AdministrationTransittransportationTransportation in TransitionU.S. PIRG

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

After the pandemic hit, Twin Peaks Boulevard was closed to vehicle traffic, a situation lauded by open space advocates. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
New proposal to partially reopen Twin Peaks to vehicles pleases no one

Neighbors say closure brought crime into residential streets, while advocates seek more open space

Members of the Sheriff’s Department command staff wore masks at a swearing-in ceremony for Assistant Sheriff Tanzanika Carter. One attendee later tested positive. 
Courtesy SFSD
Sheriff sees increase in COVID-19 cases as 3 captains test positive

Command staff among 10 infected members in past week

Rainy weather is expected in the coming week. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Rainstorms, potential atmospheric river expected to drench Bay Area in coming week

By Eli Walsh Bay City News Foundation Multiple rainstorms, cold temperatures some… Continue reading

U.S. Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman’s powerful reading was among the highlights of Inauguration Day. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Inauguration shines light in this never-ending shade

Here’s to renewal and resolve in 2021 and beyond

Lowell High School is considered an academically elite public school. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Students denounce ‘rampant, unchecked racism’ at Lowell after slurs flood anti-racism lesson

A lesson on anti-racism at Lowell High School on Wednesday was bombarded… Continue reading

Most Read