Zimmer Cassiol, left, a community liaison with SF Public Works and Kate Ganim, a principal designer with LMNOP Design, lead students in Marissa Stone's second grade class at Jean Parker Elementary through Ed's Neighborhood, an interactive San Francisco streetscape to teach them about traffic safety as part of The City's Vision Zero campaign on Friday, April 13, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Zimmer Cassiol, left, a community liaison with SF Public Works and Kate Ganim, a principal designer with LMNOP Design, lead students in Marissa Stone's second grade class at Jean Parker Elementary through Ed's Neighborhood, an interactive San Francisco streetscape to teach them about traffic safety as part of The City's Vision Zero campaign on Friday, April 13, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Students learn traffic safety in new SF streetscape

Supervisor Norman Yee on Friday unveiled “Ed’s Neighborhood,” a custom-built San Francisco streetscape named after the late Mayor Ed Lee that is designed to help teach school children important traffic safety lessons.

The life-sized, interactive mini-city, which includes moving cars, bicycle lanes, intersections and bus platforms, was presented at a ceremony at Jean Parker Elementary School, where students got to explore it for themselves.

Yee first learned of a similar project in Los Angeles, called Los Angeles Street Smarts, in 2014, and arranged to have it set up at Lakeshore Elementary School. He then worked to secure $250,000 to have one built for San Francisco.

Yee said the set will help educate children about traffic safety and work toward the City’s Vision Zero goal of reducing traffic fatalities to zero by 2024.

“I am a survivor of a near-fatal traffic collision almost eleven years ago, when I was crossing the street in the crosswalk. The pain and suffering it caused me and my family is something I never want another family to experience,” Yee said.

Nationally, 21 percent of all pedestrians killed in collisions are children, with the highest number of such fatalities occurring among five to nine-year-olds. Almost 60 percent of these pedestrian injuries and deaths occur when children are crossing a road or between intersections.

 

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Students in Marissa Stone's second grade class at Jean Parker Elementary School react as they see a car backing out of a garage in Ed's Neighborhood, an interactive San Francisco streetscape designed to teach them about traffic safety as part of The City's Vision Zero campaign on Friday, April 13, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)




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