Students honored for green thinking

In February, a group of Foster City third-graders marched on City Hall to demand that officials do something about climate change.

The group from Foster City Elementary School came with a range of suggestions. And at least one of their suggestions caught the ears of council members: lower the $800 fee for solar panel permits, one of the highest solar fees in the region.

Since then, the city not only lowered the fee, they’ve eliminated it.

On Thursday, the third-graders were recognized by a company that probably stands to gain the most from that change. Foster City-based Solar City, the largest solar installer in the state, presented a plaque to the civically minded children.

Solar City representative Bruce Carney called the children, former students of teachers Rosanne Wong and Patricia Blanchard, “solar champions.”

Wong said she’d presented the idea of marching to City Hall to her students, but they were the ones to brainstorm and then research the suggestions they would give. She said each student gave a presentation to the council members.

Nine-year-old Robert Horne claims credit for giving the presentation on lowering solarpermit fees.

He said he believes climate change is real, but when asked if he worries about it, he took a philosophical approach to the matter.

“Yes and no,” he said. “Yes, because I don’t really want the whole world to be flooded, but no, because I think the world might have been getting too cold anyway.”

kworth@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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