Struggling CCSF might shut some campuses

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerFight for survival: City College of San Francisco is looking to cut costs and keep its accreditation.

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerFight for survival: City College of San Francisco is looking to cut costs and keep its accreditation.

Closing two campuses to help City College of San Francisco fix its operations and finances are among a number of recommendations named in a draft progress report as steps for the institution to stay in operation.

The draft report released this week, attempts to address the 14 recommendations from the Accreditation Commission for Junior and Community Colleges, which gave the college a “show cause” finding during its March visit. The report, due Oct. 15, paints a picture of the steps that have already been taken and the ones that still need to be addressed in order for City College to ultimately keep its accreditation, a ruling that should be made by June
Larry Kamer, spokesman for the college, said the report shows a significant amount of work, but noted there is still a lot of work ahead.

“It does represent a significant amount of work for an institution that had a number of embedded challenges and problems,” he said. “CCSF will hit a significant milestone with getting this in on time.”

Closing the Castro — one of the 10 campuses the college has throughout The City — and the Preisdio learning location will be discussed Thursday, along with a recommendation to reorganize the structure of the entire district to better organize academics. And Interim Chancellor Pamila Fisher will also ask the board of trustees to consider a long-term lease at the administrative Gough Street location to increase revenue. Trustee Chris Jackson said he worries that the campus closures would take away a resource from local communities.

“Closing campuses might have unintended consequences,” he said. “It could be disenfranchising the community who can make use of it, and could lose state funding. I think we should think long and hard at closures.”

According to the report, the college has set up 14 working groups to address each of the items highlighted by the accreditation report for improvement. Structural changes including reducing the number of vice chancellors from five to three have already been made as well as consolidation some departments.

Before the Accreditation Commission’s report was released, City College officials asked for an independent review of its finances from the Financial Crisis and Management Assistance Team. That report, released earlier this month, issued 45 recommendations. The progress report released this week incorporates a timeline to address these recommendations as well.

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Accreditation Commission for Junior and CommunityBay Area NewsCity College of San Franciscoeducation

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