Avery Nulph, a union captain with Unite Here Local 2, leads a chant as workers picket outside the Marriott Marquis in downtown San Francisco on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Avery Nulph, a union captain with Unite Here Local 2, leads a chant as workers picket outside the Marriott Marquis in downtown San Francisco on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Striking Boston Marriott workers reach tentative agreement, negotiations continue in San Francisco

Some 1,500 striking Marriott hotel workers in Boston, Mass. have reached a tentative agreement in contract negotiations with the hotel corporation today.

A ratification vote by the membership of UNITE HERE Local 26, the union representing the hotel workers in Boston, is scheduled to take place Saturday afternoon. Union leaders have indicated that the tentative agreement is expected to pass.

Meanwhile, negotiations drag on in San Francisco and Hawaii, where a vast majority of the workers who joined the national strike, or 5,200 of the original 7,700 UNITE HERE Marriott workers, have not returned to work.

A total of 2,700 hotel workers are out on strike in Maui and Oahu, while 2,500  Marriott employees in San Francisco have been striking since Oct. 4.

At its height, the national strike touched eight cities.  Tentative agreements have been reached and ratified in San Jose, Oakland, San Diego, and Detroit.

UNITE HERE LOCAL 2, the union representing workers in San Francisco, is expected to meet with Marriott’s leadership on Monday to continue the negotiations.  They are asking for increased job security and workplace safety protections, higher wages and for the company to address issues over workers’ pensions and healthcare benefits.

“We are pleased with the movement made by Marriott in Boston and hope that they will continue making reasonable movement in negotiations in the remaining strike locations of Oahu, Maui, and San Francisco for the 5,200 Marriott workers still on strike – but we are prepared to stay on strike for as long as it takes for one job at the richest hotel company in the world to be enough,” said UNITE HERE press secretary Rachel Gumpert.

“When we head back to the table again on Monday in San Francisco, it is with pride for the strength and unity of the 2,500 striking UNITE HERE Local 2 Marriott workers there whose courage will transform their industry,” added Gumpert. 

lwaxmann@sfexaminer.com

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