Still no leads in Christmas Eve killing

Police continue to look for a suspect and motive in the Christmas Eve homicide involving a 44-year-old San Diego man who leaves behind a family “crushed” by his death.

Alexis Nuevo, a French-born flight attendant with United Airlines, was found on Partridge Avenue between Schwerin and Oriente streets with multiple gunshot wounds after residents reported hearing shots fired just after 2 a.m. on Christmas Eve.

Nuevo, a loving father and husband, leaves behind his wife, Stephanie, and two children, Miranda and Mathias, said his longtime friend Bryan Tucker, who spoke for the family.

Tucker described Nuevo as someone who always joined in surfing or snowboarding if he could, not so much for the physical activity but to enjoy his friends.

“He was more about the social side of life,” he said.

When he became a loving father, he quit being a bartender and became a flight attendant because he wanted to earn a “better paycheck for his family, but he still wanted to travel,” Tucker said.

Tucker remembered Nuevo, most likely from his French roots, as having quite the nose for wines, especially Marilyn Merlots. He could name the wine after tasting it even if the bottle was hidden inside a brown paper bag.

Daly City police found Nuevo dead from multiple gunshot wounds wearing his seat belt inside his car with the doors locked, said Lt. Jay Morena, the commander of the Daly City Police Detectives Division.

The car, which was running and in reverse, had backed into a tree, Morena said, and investigators are still trying to determine whether he had just pulled into the space outside his small rental unit or was pulling out of it.

Nuevo rented an apartment in the relatively quiet residential neighborhood east of the Cow Palace in order to rest during his work schedule, Morena said. Neighbors reported seeing a dark figure running from the scene, he added.

“We’re exploring investigative leads to help determine a motive,” Morena said, noting that detectives were heading to San Diego at the end of this week to talk with family and friends.

Tucker said the family was “crushed” to lose their husband and father, but they thankfully had tremendous support inside their family that was helping them cope.

“I will miss him for sure,” Tucker said.

dsmith@examiner.com

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