Stern Grove Park closed due to dangerous winds

Sigmund Stern Grove, known locally as Stern Grove Park, is temporarily closed due to wind conditions.

The San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department announced the closure in an advisory this morning.

“Stern Grove is closed for the safety of the public due to high winds,” Joey Kahn, a spokesman for SF Rec and Park told the Examiner. “It will remain closed until the winds subside and we determine that it is safe for the public to re-renter.”

When asked to elaborate – for instance, if winds would fell trees – Kahn did not respond to requests for comment. Stern Grove was closed in 2014 due to the danger of falling trees last year, according to alerts from SF Rec and Park.

Falling tree limbs were a danger in Stern Grove in the past. In 2009, the Board of Supervisors approved a $650,000 settlement in a lawsuit filed by the family of a woman killed when a branch fell from a redwood tree in Stern Grove and crushed her vehicle.

As the Examiner previously reported, in 2008 San Francisco resident Kathleen Bolton was loading her car in the grove’s concert meadow parking lot when the branch fell onto the car, crushing it and killing her.

At about 4 p.m. Tuesday wind speed was clocked at 29 mph in San Francisco, according to the National Weather Service.

The National Weather Service did not issue any wind hazard advisories today in San Francisco, but did warn Northern California in general will see rain return late Wednesday through Thursday, and that colder weather is forecast for Friday into next week, with “freezing temperatures possible Friday and Saturday night.”

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