Stefani leads District 2 race in early returns

Supervisor Catherine Stefani greets supporters at her campaign party on election night. (David Rodriguez/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Supervisor Catherine Stefani greets supporters at her campaign party on election night. (David Rodriguez/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Supervisor Catherine Stefani took an early lead Tuesday in the four-candidate contest to represent the Marina and Pacific Heights on the Board of Supervisors.

The early returns are primarily made up of the vote by mail ballots that were cast before Tuesday and received by the Department of Elections. Stefani leads the second top vote-getter, Nick Josefowitz, a Bart Board member, by about 1,000 first-choice votes.

“We have not yet won, but I like what I see so far,” she told a crowd of supporters at Silver Clouds karaoke bar in the Marina. “It is not over yet. But it is so important to me that you helped me carry the message of kindness in politics, grace in politics, and reaching across the aisle in politics because that’s what we need.”

Stefani was a longtime legislative aide for the two previous District 2 supervisors, Michela Alioto-Pier and Mark Farrell, and went on to serve as the county clerk. Farrell appointed her as District 2 supervisor in January to fill his former seat after he was voted in by the board as mayor to serve temporarily.

Supervisor Catherine Stefani greets supporters at her campaign party on election night. (David Rodriguez/Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Stefani, a moderate, was seen as the progressives’ best ally in the four-candidate contest.

District 2, which includes Pacific Heights and the Marina, is among the wealthiest and relatively most conservative of districts. Her years of work in the district created strong ties among neighborhood groups.

Josefowitz, a founder of solar energy company RenGen Energy, raised the most money in the contest, about $800,000 to Stefani’s $300,000. Around $500,000 of that was his own money.

Josefowitz cast himself as an outsider, ready to shake up City Hall to address issues like homelessness.

Schuyler Hudak, the founder of media start-up company Cor, raised the third most money in the contest, followed by Republican John Dennis.

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