State agency votes to increase fees paid by CleanPowerSF customers

Consumers will pay higher fees to participate in clean electricity programs such as CleanPowerSF following a vote by a state commission Thursday.

Mayor London Breed and the mayors of Oakland and San Jose issued a joint statement condemning the vote by the California Public Utilities Commission, which changes a key formula that determines how much utilities like PG&E can charge customers who buy electricity through programs such as CleanPowerSF. The program, run by the city of San Francisco, provides customers with electricity from clean energy sources.

SEE RELATED: CPUC vote could raise CleanPowerSF fees; Mayor calls for delay

“Today the CPUC delivered a severe blow to California ratepayers and the state’s environmental goals,” the mayors wrote. “Coming just days after Governor Brown signed Senate Bill 100, this decision flies in the face of California’s new commitment to reach 100 percent renewable energy by 2045.”

Gov. Jerry Brown signed SB 100 ahead of the Global Climate Action Summit held in San Francisco last month. It requires all electricity in the state to be generated by zero emission sources by 2045.

“Today’s action will have increased the exit fee by 250 percent since San Francisco’s CleanPowerSF program launched in 2015,” the statement said. “We strongly rebuke today’s corporate-leaning, anti-environment decision and will redouble our efforts to ensure clean power is an affordable option for the 2.5 million Bay Area residents that we represent.”

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