Stanford looks north for campus extension

Stanford University has submitted plans for a 33-acre satellite campus in Redwood City that would become the prestigious school’s first location outside of the immediate Palo Alto community.

No classes would likely be offered at the “Stanford in Redwood City” campus, but it would include up to 12 medical and administrative office buildings. The campus would be near the 11-acre outpatient medical facility currently being constructed on 450 Broadway adjacent to U.S. Highway 101.

Possible occupants of the site include the School of Medicine, the chief financial officer, IT services, three “major” components of the library, the office of research and administration, the department of business affairs, academic “start-up” ventures and continuing education departments, according to the university.

“Over time, the list of groups that will relocate to Stanford in Redwood City will evolve and grow,” the university said in its application to the city.

The 1.53 million-square-foot project would triple the size of the existing Stanford property and include up to five parking structures with 5,100 spaces.

“It’s an excellent community to potentially be a member of,” said Jean McCown, Stanford’s director of community relations. “It’s seven miles away [from Palo Alto].”

The project was submitted in late May and the Redwood City Planning Commission recently kicked off its approval process, recommending the City Council approve a lengthy process that will require rezoning the area.

The council will approve or deny the process in mid-August, and reports will be done for about one year before any construction can begin, senior planner Maureen Riordan said.

The planning process will determine the effects the campus would have on nearby traffic, homes and businesses, Riordan said.

A new onramp could be built to provide the campus with direct access to Highway 101, the city said.

The 46-acre plot of land is zoned for “light industrial” uses. It used to host the Mid-Point Technology campus, which housed offices and technology companies. In addition to the outpatient facility, Genentech also owns a 2.29-acre property there.

The project likely would supply some money to the city in the short term, but the facility would not provide property taxes to the city, so no long-term benefits are expected for city coffers, Riordan said.

Vice Mayor Diane Howard said her peers are still debating the issue of rezoning the area and was not able to comment on the project’s future.

“Stanford is obviously a wonderful university and very helpful to the community,” Howard said.

mrosenberg@sfexaminer.com

By the numbers

Outlining the “Stanford in Redwood City” project

33 Acres of new campus

11 Acres of outpatient facility being constructed on site

1.525 million Size of new campus in square feet

360,000 Square feet of outpatient facility

5,100 Parking spaces

12 Buildings

Source: Redwood City Planning Department

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