Standout San Francisco bans of 2010

San Francisco loves to ban things, and this last year proved to be no exception.

Sad day
Kids’ meals — and all other toy giveaways — were banned unless the meals met certain nutritional guidelines. Now kids who eat fast food will be denied the toy that generations before them came to know and love.

Bottle shock

San Francisco proposed a ban on bottled water, which can be a rather important item after a major earthquake. So what, there has not been a big one in years …

Cats meow for rights
Cats already miffed about being spayed or neutered caught a break in San Francisco, the first major city in the nation to outlaw declawing over animal-cruelty issues.

Cutting-edge legislation
A proposed 2011 ballot measure would ban male circumcision in The City, making the practice a misdemeanor offense. However, if you are older than 18, you would be able to make the decision for the procedure, according to the proposal.

Smokers smoked
You can no longer smoke while seated at an outdoor cafe or restaurant in San Francisco — along with many other places, such as ATM lines. However, drunken bar hoppers are still allowed to smoke on the curb as traffic zooms by.

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