Stabbed S.F. artist to make return

The San Francisco artist who was recently stabbed while painting a mural on Market Street to benefit a city beautification project will resume work on the piece on Saturday.

Glen Park resident Jason Hailey, also known as “Chor Boogie,” has been painting a nearly half-block-long mural in the 1000 block of Market Street as part of a series of city projects intended to beautify the seedy strip and attract more pedestrians and bicyclists.

He was stabbed while doing so at around 7:15 p.m. on Nov. 7 by thieves attempting to steal his paint.

“Chor is in pain, but resting up and preparing for a resilient return to this amazing creation for Market Street,” the San Francisco Arts Commission said in a statement.

A celebration will accompany the artist’s return to the piece on Saturday at 11 a.m., the commission said. He will deliver a brief welcome speech, a live demonstration on the mural, and will also pick children from the audience to participate in painting the mural.

“We are thrilled Chor will complete the mural,” Director of Cultural Affairs Luis R. Cancel said in the statement. “Artists often work in adverse settings to bring hope and change to neighborhoods and we support Chor's determination.”
 

Bay Area NewsJason HaileyStabbingUnder the Dome

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