Speed bumps added on Dolores Street after skateboarding injuries

Speed bumps added on Dolores Street after skateboarding injuries

City officials hurried to add new speed bumps to Dolores Street near Dolores Park this weekend after multiple collisions involving skateboarders left at least one person with life-threatening injuries.

The stretch of Dolores known as Dolores Hill is a popular site for “hill bombing,” in which skateboarders hurtle down the broad, sloping street at high speeds.

Jeffrey Tumlin, head of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, tweeted images of the new speed bumps Saturday afternoon.

“SF has a world renowned skate scene I love. So I hate doing this to Dolores,” Tumlin said. “Consulting now with leaders about building stronger skate culture and co-designing Slow Streets.”

Tumlin initially said there were two deaths on the hill, but later corrected his statement to note that there were no confirmed fatalities.

According to police, a collision between a bicyclist and a skateboarder was reported Friday shortly before 5:45 p.m. near Dolores and Cumberland streets. The bicyclist, a man in his 20s, was taken to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, while the man on a skateboard suffered injuries that were not considered life-threatening.

Less than a hour later, police said officers saw a 14-year-old boy fall off his skateboard at 19th and Dolores streets. That boy was taken to the hospital with injuries that were not considered life-threatening.

Video footage from the event also shows a pedestrian with serious injuries being taken away by ambulance on Friday.

An annual hill bomb event often draws large crowds to the area and in past years has seen confrontations with police and some serious injuries. This year, however, events appear to have happened on more than one day this month.

Supervisor Rafael Mandelman on Friday said on Facebook that skateboarders had taken over Dolores Street “for the third time in a little over a week.” He described multiple serious injuries at the events and alleged that “neighbors have been assaulted and nearby schools and homes have been damaged.”

“This has to stop,” he said in the Facebook post. “Over the last week my office has been working with SPFD, MTA and Public Works to find a solution that will stop this dangerous situation from continuing.”

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