Construction work begins on a permanent supportive housing complex at 1064 Mission St. in South of Market on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Construction work begins on a permanent supportive housing complex at 1064 Mission St. in South of Market on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

SoMa supportive housing project on former federal property breaks ground

San Francisco city officials on Thursday broke ground on a new supportive housing complex in San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood — set to add 256 units to the city’s affordable housing stock once completed by late next year.

The development, at 1064 Mission St., will provide housing for adults and seniors who are exiting homelessness, and it will also be home to the city’s new Homeless Services Center, which will include the San Francisco Homeless Outreach Team, the Street Medicine Team and the relocated Department of Public Health Urgent Care Clinic. The project is part of the mayor’s Homelessness Recovery Plan, which aims to find treatment for some 6,000 San Franciscans experiencing homelessness over the next two years.

“Permanent supportive housing is an integral part of our Homelessness Recovery Plan, and every new unit we add helps people exit our shelter system and makes more space available in shelter for people who are currently on the streets,” Mayor London Breed said in a statement. “In addition to housing, this site will offer much-needed workforce development and will provide a centralized location for our city’s homelessness services.”

The project is being developed by the organization Mercy Housing. Once completed, Episcopal Community Services will operate it. The development is being built on a former parking lot for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The city acquired the site back in 2017, buying it from the federal government for just $1 for the purpose of developing housing for the homeless.

“For San Franciscans, solving homelessness is not an issue, it’s a value,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said. “I was proud to play my part in helping secure this federal property for just $1. Today, we are one step closer to transforming this parking lot into permanent, supportive housing to ensure compassionate solutions to aid people experiencing homelessness and housing insecurity.”

“Housing is the solution to homelessness and is a critical component of our Homeless Response System of care, which moves thousands of people into stability every year,” said Abigail Stewart-Kahn, interim director of the San Francisco Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. “Throughout this public health crisis, it is imperative to protect the most vulnerable in our community with the mayor’s long-term Homeless Recovery Plan and to ensure that San Francisco is a livable city for everyone.”

“DPH will provide primary care, urgent care, behavioral health, and dental services in the new (Homeless Services) Center. Our vision is to connect more people to more of the services they need, all under one roof, with wraparound care,”said Grant Colfax, director of the city’s Department of Public Health.

In addition to housing and the Homeless Services Center, the development will also be equipped with a 6,000 square-foot commercial kitchen space for Episcopal Community Services’ Conquering Homelessness through Employment in Food Services, or CHEFS program. The 12-week program helps formerly homeless residents gain experience through hands-on training and paid internships at local restaurants.

Bay Area NewsHousing and HomelessnessPlanningsan francisco news

 

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

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