Small business report past due, but business advocate says mayor making progress

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerLooking to open: Business advocates look forward to a report on streamlining permits for small businesses.

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerLooking to open: Business advocates look forward to a report on streamlining permits for small businesses.

With tech firms seemingly the beneficiary of much of the love coming out of City Hall these days, small businesses feel somewhat neglected in the wake of the realization that a voter-mandated report on how to make life easier on them is now years past due.

In November 2007, voters approved Proposition I, a ballot measure requiring the issuance of a report on how San Francisco can streamline its many regulations affecting small businesses. To this day, the report has not been issued. Board of Supervisors President David Chiu has long called for completion of the report, and on Tuesday he called out Mayor Ed Lee for failing to live up to his prior commitment of completing the report by June. In March, Lee told the board that he would get the report done by June.

Small-business advocate Scott Hauge said Wednesday that “there’s a feeling out there” of small businesses being overshadowed by flashier tech companies — especially given the efforts of angel investor Ron Conway, a prominent supporter of the mayor, to promote tech as a major job creator.

But Hauge gave Lee credit for doing what previous mayors have refused to do — namely, sitting down with him and other small-business owners on a quarterly basis. That began in October.

Hauge credited Chiu for his persistence on the issue, but he also said that, if he were Chiu, he would be “encouraged” by Lee’s efforts.

On Tuesday, during the regular question time session at the Board of Supervisors, Lee said that he was committed to completing the report and that progress is occurring.

The mayor said that data and analysis from the 16 city departments that small businesses must deal with will be completed by June. After that, The City plans to formally unveil its now-beta section on the website License123.com, an online permitting tool to help businesses identify the permits they need.

“We have a long way to go to make registering and permitting a small business as painless as buying an online widget,” Lee said. “That’s my goal.”

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsDavid ChiuGovernment & PoliticsLocalPoliticssmall business

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Dave Hodges, pastor at Zide Door, the Church of Entheogenic Plants that include marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms, holds some psychedelic mushrooms inside the Oakland church on Friday, July 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Psychedelic spirituality: Inside a growing Bay Area religious movement

‘They are guiding us into something ineffable’

A former inmate and a sheriff’s deputy are among the first four members chosen to serve on the newly created Sheriff’s Department Oversight Board. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Years after fight club scandal, Sheriff’s oversight board takes shape

‘We want to promote law enforcement best practices’

More than a thousand people gathered in front of the California Capitol building to protest Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay at home order and demand that the state re-open on May 1, 2020. (Photo by Anne Wernikoff for CalMatters)
Newsom blames ‘right-wing pundits’ for COVID surge

By Emily Hoeven CalMatters Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday placed the blame… Continue reading

Strong California revenues will allow the state to commit to offering no-cost food to every student. (Amanda Mills/Pixnio)
How California plans to offer free daily meals to 6 million public school students

By Ali Tadayon EdSource With one in every six children facing hunger… Continue reading

Most Read