Skipping meter payments may cost more

Drivers parking in downtown South San Francisco could expect to pay more if they do not feed the meter.

The Police Department is asking the City Council to increase meter violations from $15 to $25, a 66 percent increase, in the Downtown Parking District to help cover increasing costs of parking enforcement and to encourage people to pay the meters more frequently.

The issue is on the consent agenda for Wednesday’s City Council meeting and is likely to pass.

The city currently has 356 spaces in the Downtown Parking District, which extends from Airport Boulevard west to Spruce Avenue; 238 of those spaces are specifically for city parking permit holders. Money from the meters goes to maintaining city parking lots inside the district as well as paying the salary of change collectors and meter repairmen, said Chief Mark Raffaelli.

The fines were last increased in 2002 when they went from $11 to $15, and in a survey done by the South San Francisco Police Department, the fines in South City are some of the lowest around.

In 2006, the police issued 9,351 citations for meter violations, bringing in $140,265 to the city’s coffers, but $64,521.90 of that went to fees and other funds, according to a staff report. If the fine increased to $25, the city would bring in $233,775 and net $169,253.10, $93,510 more than 2006.

Raffaelli said that the increased revenue from the citations, if passed, would go toward paying for salary increases, equipment upkeep and supplies.

Mayor Rich Garbarino said that he had “some concern” about the increased violations affecting people who want to park there but most should be able to conduct their downtown business in under two hours.

dsmith@examiner.com


Online today: Do you frequently park in South San Francisco?

Share your comments below.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

California is set to receive supplies of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which is still under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (Courtesy photo)
California could receive 380K doses of new J&J COVID vaccine next week

California could receive 380,300 doses of the new Johnson & Johnson vaccine… Continue reading

Disability advocates protested outside the home of San Francisco Health Officer Tomas Aragon. (Courtesy Brooke Anderson)
Vaccine rollout plan for people with disabilities remains deeply flawed

On February 13, disability activists paid a visit to the house of… Continue reading

A Bay Area Concrete Recycling facility that opened on PG&E property in 2019. Former PG&E employees have been accused of accepting bribes from Bay Area Concrete. (Courtesy of Bay Area Concrete Recycling via ProPublica)
Lawsuit reveals new allegations against PG&E contractor accused of fraud

By Scott Morris Bay City News Foundation Utility giant Pacific Gas &… Continue reading

New protected bicycle lanes stretch from the city's Portola District to Bernal Heights. (Courtesy Bay City News)
City leaders celebrate protected bike lanes in city’s Portola, Bernal Heights neighborhoods

San Francisco city leaders on Thursday announced the completion of new protected… Continue reading

A short walk leads to the base of Yosemite Falls, requiring no snow gear except in heavy winter conditions. (Matt Johanson/Special to S.F. Examiner)
Snowy destinations abound in Yosemite winter

Those who journey to the mountains discover grand scenery, solitude .

Most Read