Sit-lie in effect, but will police enforce it?

The City’s voter-approved sit-lie law goes into effect today, but police say they’re not going to sweep the sidewalks of vagrants quite yet.

The department answers a list of frequently asked questions on its website. It includes a list of exceptions to the law, such as someone sitting on the sidewalk waiting for a parade or a cafe patron sipping a cappuccino at a sidewalk table.

But for those targeted by the law, the Police Department says it will hold off on enforcement as it collects public feedback on how the department should train its officers.

“The Police Department recognizes the importance of educating people — members of the public and officers — about this new law. The Department is developing policies and procedures for enforcement of this ordinance, and a training program for officers. An initial period of public awareness and education is planned, as well. Therefore, the Department will not initiate enforcement action under Section 168 until we have had opportunity to inform the public about the law, and our officers are trained on the related policies and procedures.”

Police say they will begin enforcement on sit-lie on Feb. 1.

Send your comments to sfpdmediarelations@sfgov.org .

bbegin@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsSan FranciscoSFPDUnder the Dome

Just Posted

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

The Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus is pictured on Jan. 14. The Democrats’ Build Back Better bill would enable free community college nationwide, but CCSF is already tuition-free for all San Francisco residents. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Biden’s Build Back Better bill would mean for San Franciscans

Not much compared to other places — because The City already provides several key features

A directional sign at Google in Mountain View, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. Workers at Google and Amazon are demanding their companies pull out of Project Nimbus, a $1.2 billion contract to provide cloud services for the Israeli military and government. (Laura Morton/The New York Times)
Google and Amazon employees criticize $1.2 billion cloud services contract with Israel

‘We can create a world in which tech companies can thrive without doing harm’

Most Read