Sidewalks receive mixed reviews

The city’s sidewalks range from fair to poor condition overall, but officials say there is little wiggle room in the budget to make more significant repairs in the next five years.

The Parks and Recreation Commission last week discussed a deteriorating piece of sidewalk in front of Washington Park on the 800 to 900 block of Burlingame Avenue, after concerns surfaced about potential hazards to pedestrians, Parks and Recreation Director Randy Schwartz said.

Band-Aid patches can be made to sidewalks raised because of stretching tree roots, according to city engineer Donald Chang, but long-term fixes will likely continue to be made piece-by-piece to different parts of the city every year.

Burlingame’s approximately 18,000 trees are the main reason for sidewalk repairs. The towering eucalyptus on El Camino Real cause the most damage, but those trees and road are regulated by Caltrans, Public Works Director George Bagdon said.

Mills Estates along Trousdale Drive have the best, newest sidewalks, while areas east of the railroad tracks around Easton Drive are the worst, Bagdon said, which falls in line with the general observation that residential sidewalks are typically worse off because there are more trees there.

The city used to pay for all sidewalk repairs, but Burlingame and many other cities shifted responsibility for repairs to sidewalks adjacent to private property to the property owners after the economic downturn two years ago.

The city rotates where repairs are made each year, dispatching crews to a different section of the city every year. It takes approximately 20 years to finish the whole city.

Approximately $400,000 annually in capital funds is now dedicated to city sidewalk repairs, a figure that remains steady over the next several years, according to the city’s adopted five-year capital improvements plan.

tramroop@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Talika Fletcher, sister of Roger Allen, is consoled at a vigil to honor her brother, who was killed by Daly City Police on April 7, on Wednesday, April 14, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Supporters march for SF man killed by Daly City police

Struggle over fake gun ends in shooting of 44-year-old Roger Allen, DA says

Server Dragos Pintlie drops off a bay shrimp louie salad for Howard Golden at John’s Grill as indoor dining resumes on Wednesday, March 3, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
City to allow expanded indoor dining, limited indoor concerts and small conferences

With new COVID-19 cases remaining stable, San Francisco will continue to expand… Continue reading

San Francisco Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto (47) starts against the Pittsburg Pirates at Oracle Park on September 10, 2019 in San Francisco, California. Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner.
Cueto leaves with injury as Giants take series from Reds

A latissimus dorsi injury to Johnny Cueto cast a dark cloud over… Continue reading

Kyle and Kristin Hart shown with their children. Kyle was shot and killed by police three days after the birth of their daughter, Ellie. (Courtesy of the Hart family)
Wife of Redwood City man killed by police files federal lawsuit

Kristin Hart calls for city to improve its response to those suffering a mental health crisis

Chase Center and the Golden State Warriors hosted a media Welcome Back conference to discuss the safety protocols and amenities when fans return for a basketball game on April 23rd at Chase Center on April 13, 2021 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Golden State Warriors ready to welcome fans back to Chase Center

COVID-19 tests, app-based food ordering among new safety protocols announced this week

Most Read