Sidewalks receive mixed reviews

The city’s sidewalks range from fair to poor condition overall, but officials say there is little wiggle room in the budget to make more significant repairs in the next five years.

The Parks and Recreation Commission last week discussed a deteriorating piece of sidewalk in front of Washington Park on the 800 to 900 block of Burlingame Avenue, after concerns surfaced about potential hazards to pedestrians, Parks and Recreation Director Randy Schwartz said.

Band-Aid patches can be made to sidewalks raised because of stretching tree roots, according to city engineer Donald Chang, but long-term fixes will likely continue to be made piece-by-piece to different parts of the city every year.

Burlingame’s approximately 18,000 trees are the main reason for sidewalk repairs. The towering eucalyptus on El Camino Real cause the most damage, but those trees and road are regulated by Caltrans, Public Works Director George Bagdon said.

Mills Estates along Trousdale Drive have the best, newest sidewalks, while areas east of the railroad tracks around Easton Drive are the worst, Bagdon said, which falls in line with the general observation that residential sidewalks are typically worse off because there are more trees there.

The city used to pay for all sidewalk repairs, but Burlingame and many other cities shifted responsibility for repairs to sidewalks adjacent to private property to the property owners after the economic downturn two years ago.

The city rotates where repairs are made each year, dispatching crews to a different section of the city every year. It takes approximately 20 years to finish the whole city.

Approximately $400,000 annually in capital funds is now dedicated to city sidewalk repairs, a figure that remains steady over the next several years, according to the city’s adopted five-year capital improvements plan.

tramroop@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Some people are concerned that University of California, San Francisco’s expansion at its Parnassus campus could cause an undesirable increase in the number of riders on Muni’s N-Judah line.<ins></ins>
Will UCSF’s $20 million pledge to SFMTA offset traffic woes?

An even more crowded N-Judah plus increased congestion ahead cause concern

Toni Isabella, a counselor at Ohlhoff Recovery Programs, finds helpful assistance from service dog Barker Posey.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Toni Isabella: Helping people indoors and out recover from addiction’s dark side

Counselor supports holistic, progressive approach to healing

A health care worker receives one of the first COVID-19 vaccine doses at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital on Tuesday Dec. 15, 2020. (Courtesy SFgov)
SF to open three large sites for COVID-19 vaccinations

Breed: ‘We need more doses. We are asking for more doses’

San Jose Sharks (pictured Feb. 15, 2020 vs. Minnesota Wild at Xcel Energy Center) open the season on Monday against the St. Louis Blues in St. Louis. (Tribune News Service archive)
This week in Bay Area sports

A look at the upcoming major Bay Area sports events (schedules subject… Continue reading

Tongo Eisen-Martin, a Bernal Heights resident, named San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Tongo Eisen-Martin becomes San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate

Bernal Heights resident Tongo Eisen-Martin has become San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate.… Continue reading

Most Read