Sidewalk art permits’ cost may increase

Street artists selling their artwork in San Francisco are worried a recommended fee hike will hurt their estimated $4 million industry.

Under The City’s street-artist program, artists must pay an annual fee to obtain a city permit to set up shop at various sidewalk locations and sell artwork, which is required to be made by the seller.

The Arts Commission has recommended that the 390 permit holders, who have paid $419.20 a year, start paying $532.28 a year.

That is not sitting right with many street artists. The Board of Supervisors Budget and Finance Committee voted 3-1 Wednesday to approve the recommended fee increase. The fee, which requires full board approval, would go into effect July 1.

Supervisor Chris Daly opposed the fee increase because, he said, it places an “undue burden” on the street artists.

Street artist Michael Addario showed the board a petition signed by 100 licensed street artists opposing the increase. The petition calls for a staff reduction to the Arts Commission, which collects revenue from the fees to pay for several expenses, such as the salaries of two staff members who oversee the program.

Howard Lazar, director of the Street Artist Program, said that the fee increase is needed to ensure the program operates at no expense to The City’s operating budget.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Competing Hayes Valley petitions reveal fractured response to tent encampments

Some business owners say they signed a ‘tent-free zone’ petition unwittingly

SF cops to vote on delayed raises amid pandemic

City officials have agreed to new pay raises for officers under a… Continue reading

Balboa Reservoir project wins approval from Board of Supervisors

Development will build 1,100 housing units on 17-acre parking lot near City College

Supervisors fear Tenderloin lawsuit settlement sets bad precedent

UC Hastings case pushed city to move more homeless residents into hotels or shelters

What California knows about Kamala Harris

More than any other vice presidential contender in a generation, Kamala Harris’… Continue reading

Most Read