City College of San Francisco is trying to address any lack of funding the school may experience due to lower enrollment and an ever-shrinking budget, which could cost it faculty positions. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/ Special to S.F. Examiner)

Shrinking budget expected to cost CCSF faculty, staff positions

City College of San Francisco could lose dozens of staff and even more faculty positions in the coming years if student enrollment continues to decline, but college officials are hoping they can reverse the downward trend.

CCSF administrators presented four scenarios to the Board of Trustees on Thursday, which projected the college’s shrinking budget through the 2020-21 school year.

In the worst-case scenario, the college could lose as many as 30 staff positions and 345 Full-Time Equivalent Faculty by 2021. FTEF does not refer to individuals, but a calculation of the hours worked by both full-time and part-time faculty.

“There’s a lot of concern and I think there’s a lot of anxiety in the college about it,” said board President Rafael Mandelman. “This is not a pleasant thing to do.”

While all four scenarios result in downsizing, college officials want to boost student enrollment — and the state funding that comes with it — through Proposition W.

San Francisco voters passed the ballot measure Nov. 8, approving a real-estate tax that is meant to make CCSF free for students.

But even in the best-case scenario for CCSF, where the college’s student population is increased by about 20 percent, the college will still have to reduce five staff positions and the equivalent of about 58 full-time faculty by 2021.

Faculty union head Tim Killikelly said that the projected reductions — which he calls “cuts” — are “devastating.”

“We have really been encouraging a policy of really trying to grow the college,” said Killikelly, president of the American Federation of Teachers Local 2121.

With state stability funding expected to end after this school year, AFT 2121, the Board of Trustees and administration all united to push for Prop. W. California gave CCSF about $143.5 million since 2013 to offset the decline in enrollment it experienced during its accreditation crisis. The school remains open and fully accredited today.

“We have these financial stepdowns coming due to the loss of stability funding,” said CCSF spokesperson Jeff Hamilton. “The board is simply exploring options at this point.”

None of the scenarios are set in stone, Hamilton said.

In the middle-ground scenarios — if student enrollment flatlines or decreases slightly — the college could lose from five to 20 staff positions, as well as between the equivalent of 168.2 and 248.2 full-time faculty.

“These are all sort of scenarios that seem within the realm of reasonable feasibility, but of course we’re going to try and outperform,” Mandelman said.

This story has been updated from its original version.education

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