SFUSD's windfall to enhance college, career prep

San Francisco schools have received a gift of money to spend just in time for the holidays.

The district received $1 million in federal grant money to “enhance data improvement systems.”

According to the California Department of Education, “funds will be used by schools to acquire and maintain the use of data to improve high school graduation rates and promote student readiness for college and careers.”

The San Francisco Unified School District will spend the money to improve college and career readiness courses in the 9th grade, known as “Plan Ahead.” The district will purchase interactive projectors, student response system, a document camera, several laptops and training for teachers, according to district officials.

An estimated 151 districts and schools were awarded part of the $36 million statewide, according to the department of education.

In a released statement, Superintendent Jack O’Connell said the money will help districts improve achievement by effectively collecting data.

“With the state budget crisis continuing, our cash-strapped schools desperately need these funds as soon as possible so they can use education data and technology to better prepare students for college or careers,” he said.

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsSan FranciscoSan Francisco Unified School DistrictUnder the Dome

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