SFUSD to share gun safety tips with parents

San Francisco public school officials for the second time plan to distribute letters to parents this week about gun safety measures after taking unprecedented steps last year to communicate such information to families.

The letters, which will be sent home Wednesday with kindergarten through 12th grade students along with regular weekly announcements, will include information about the dangers associated with having guns in the home, gun safety laws, and a San Francisco Police Department-sponsored gun buyback event on Saturday in which residents may dispose of guns.

“Guns and gun violence are a public health epidemic in the United States and in San Francisco,” said San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education Vice President Matt Haney, who last year authored a board resolution that addressed gun violence and prompted the first gun safety letter to parents from the district.

The resolution called for the district to support gun-control policies, communicate information about gun-buyback events and gun-safety practices with families, and expand upon lessons in the classroom around violence prevention, marking the district’s strongest stance yet against gun violence.

“We want our families to be educated and empowered to protect their children from the dangers of guns,” Haney said.

Homicides are the leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year-olds in The City, where the rate of youth homicides is nearly twice as high as the rest of the state, according to San Francisco’s Adolescent Health Working Group. Additionally, in 2008, of the 98 homicides reported in San Francisco, approximately 38 percent were victims ages 14 to 25.

ANONYMOUS GUN BUYBACK:

Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015

8 a.m. – 12 p.m.

1038 Howard St., San Francisco, 94103

$100 cash for handguns, shotguns & rifles

$200 cash for assault weapons as classified by the state of Californiagun buybackgun safetySan Francisco Police DepartmentSan Francisco Unified School DistrictSF public schoolsSFUSD

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