SFSU seeks to redefine reputation

San Francisco State University is using its growing pains as an excuse to redesign its image.

No longer content to be the state college in the southwest corner of town, SFSU wants to be front and center in the community's mind: as a place of academic excellence, but also for its fine arts events, athletics and recreational offerings.

Among its first gifts to the community, SFSU hopes to build a new $110 million Creative Arts building, which will have a 1,200-seat auditorium and 350-seat recital hall. That plan goes to the California State University board of trustees for approval this May. If giventhe green light, construction is scheduled to begin in 2009, with doors opening in late 2012.

This project and others will be part of a new 20-year master plan the college is preparing. The plan would address expansion concerns as the college anticipates adding the equivalent of 5,000 new full-time students to its current population of 29,000.

The key design features evolved from the vision statement for the college to have a “visible and active presence in The City” and a “myriad of programs and events [that] draw the greater community to the campus.” Another idea drafted would remove a parking structure to create a continuous recreational greenbelt through the college connecting 19th Avenue with Lake Merced. Parking would then be decentralized throughout the

campus.

For funding, the college would compete with the other Cal State University campuses, said Richard Macias, a campus planner.

SFSU staff member Jaclyn Johnson, who is also a graduate student at the college, said she felt more people would visit the college if they knew there was accessible parking throughout.

“They're not going to come at night and hike through the college or take public transportation,”

Johnson said.

The plan also hopes to address environmental and safety concerns by improving campus conditions for bicycles, and working to improve public transportation service to the university.

“There are serious capacity problems with existing services,” said Jeffrey Tumlin, a principal with San Francisco consulting firm Nelson Nygaard. The main concern is with Muni service, which he said was not frequent enough to meet student needs.

The plan also incorporates new land and housing units purchased adjacent to the college for the growing number of students who want to live on campus while creating attractive amenities to encourage campus life, includinga new gymnasium/fitness center.

beslinger@examiner.com

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Police Chief Bill Scott on Wednesday said a rebranding and reoganization of the former Gang Task Force amounts to “more than just the name change.” (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Faced with surge in shootings, Chief Scott reenvisions SFPD’s Gang Task Force

New Community Violence Reduction Team adds officers with community-policing experience

Stores including Walgreens and Safeway are required to pay their employees additional hazard pay under a city ordinance that is currently set to expire later this month. (Shutterstock)
Grocery workers could gain additional weeks of $5 per hour hazard pay

San Francisco will vote next week on whether to extend a law… Continue reading

The fatal shooting of San Francisco resident Roger Allen by Daly City police on April 7 prompted protests in both cities. (Jordi Molina/ Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Daly City approves body-worn and vehicle cameras for police after fatal shooting

Daly City officials on Wednesday approved body and vehicle cameras for police… Continue reading

Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Mays attends an event to honor the San Francisco Giants' 2014 World Series victory on Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Washington, D.C. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS)
Willie Mays turns 90: San Francisco celebrates the greatest Giant

By Al Saracevic Examiner staff writer I couldn’t believe it. Willie Mays… Continue reading

Ja’Mari Oliver, center, 11, a fifth grader at Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy, is surrounded by his classmates at a protest outside the Safeway at Church and Market streets on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 in support of him following an April 26 incident where he was falsely accused by an employee of stealing. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
School community rallies behind Black classmate stopped at Safeway

‘When you mess with one of us, you mess with all of us’

Most Read