(Rachael Garner/Special to S.F. Examiner)

SF’s sanctuary city stance could threaten law enforcement funding

Law enforcement in The City could face a loss of federal dollars if promises by President-elect Donald Trump to defund sanctuary cities come true.

Trump has promised to defund cities like San Francisco that have policies protecting undocumented immigrants, though it remains unclear how and when those federal dollars would disappear. Mayor Ed Lee has promised to defend San Francisco’s sanctuary city status.

The number of dollars that could be lost differs for each of The City’s law enforcement agencies.

The San Francisco Police Department, with a 2015-16 budget of $566.3 million, receives millions linked to federal funding from a number of sources.

Direct federal funds only make up $1.8 million of the budget, but $52.7 million comes from state funding, and it’s unclear how much of that comes from federal grants via the state.

The department did not return a request for comment, but Lee has said The City’s federal funding may be impacted by the Trump administration. He is still in a wait-and-see mode, he said at a news conference Wednesday.

The District Attorney’s Office could be impacted as well, though that office only received about $2.8 million in federal funds in fiscal year 2016-17.

Those funds include a Department of Justice $1 million grant to treat trauma in Bayview.

Like the police, the district attorney also gets federal grants worth $1.6 million that passed through the state. The DA’s 2016-17 budget is $34.7 million.

The Sheriff’s Department may be the least impacted in terms of federal funding.

Chief of Staff Eileen Hirst said the Sheriff’s Department receives little federal funding. Annually the department gets a Department of Justice grant for $19,000 for substance abuse treatment. That will have little impact on the department’s budget of about $211 million.

Still, like other agencies, the department receives state grants too, like a $90,000 grant to help pay for a mental health re-entry program.

“These grants provide very important substance abuse and mental health services. We hope not to lose them,” said Hirst.

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