SF’s public power plan hums along

San Francisco is moving toward implementing CleanPowerSF.

The City’s public power program is on track for a summer launch after a $19.5 million contract was approved Tuesday by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.

The CleanPowerSF contract with Shell Energy North America now goes to the Board of Supervisors for hearings and analysis, which are expected to begin in January.

“Today, San Francisco moved another step closer towards implementing CleanPowerSF, which will be one of the nation’s cleanest energy programs,” said SFPUC General Manager Ed Harrington.

The program will offer consumers a choice between The City’s 100 percent renewable-energy portfolio and PG&E’s 16 percent.

“It is good to give ratepayers choice and to have more competition to PG&E,” said Supervisor David Campos, who planned to introduce the contract to the board following the agency’s vote.

CleanPowerSF will cost an average of $7 to $15 a month more than PG&E for most residential customers.

The startup costs include a $15 million escrow account for a payout to Shell if the program is terminated before the contract expires in 4½ years.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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