SFPD’s Toney Chaplin hired to lead Hayward Police Department

SFPD’s Toney Chaplin hired to lead Hayward Police Department

Once in the running for SFPD police chief, Toney Chaplin will now lead Hayward’s police force.

A top-ranking San Francisco police official has been tapped to become chief of the Hayward Police Department.

Assistant Chief Toney Chaplin, who once led the San Francisco Police Department as interim chief, will start in his new role across the bay on Sept. 3, Hayward City Manager Kelly McAdoo announced Tuesday.

An Oklahoma native who lives in Hayward and is a graduate of Mission High School, Chaplin had been a rumored candidate for the position.

The late Mayor Ed Lee tapped Chaplin as interim chief of the SFPD in 2016 after then-Chief Greg Suhr resigned in response to a string of police shootings. He served in the role for seven months and vied for the position with the support of the police union until Lee replaced him with Bill Scott.

A 29-year veteran of the SFPD, Chaplin notably served as commander of the Investigations Bureau in 2015. He later became deputy chief of the newly established Bureau of Professional Standards and Principled Policing Service.

As a sergeant in 2012, Chaplin was involved in a police shooting. He shot a man who allegedly fled police while carrying a gun in the Mission. That same man was later shot by police in North Beach in 2018.

Chaplin will succeed retired Hayward Police Chief Mark Koller.

Chaplin’s departure will create an opportunity for Scott to shake up his command staff. When Assistant Chief Hector Sainez retired earlier this year, Scott tapped then-Deputy Chief Robert Moser to replace him.

In a statement Tuesday, Scott called Chaplin “a good friend and a great leader.”

“Over the course of 29 years with the SFPD, he has risen from the rank of officer to Assistant Chief and excelled at every level. Toney has worked hard to make San Francisco a safer, better place and build stronger bonds between police officers and the people we serve,” said Scott. “His unfailing energy, optimism for our City and enthusiasm for all aspects of policing will be missed. We are grateful for his service and wish him well in Hayward.”

lwaxmann@sfexaminer.com

S.F. Examiner Staff Writer Michael Barba contributed to this report.

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