The main entrance of the San Francisco Police Officers Association, pictured Aug. 31, 2016. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

The main entrance of the San Francisco Police Officers Association, pictured Aug. 31, 2016. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

SFPD union sues city, Police Commission over use of force policy

San Francisco’s police union is going to court to try to stop the implementation of a use of force policy for officers that was passed Wednesday night by the Police Commission.

The new policy, perhaps most controversially, bans officers from shooting at moving vehicles in most instances as well as the use of the carotid hold. Late Wednesday at the commission meeting, it was debated whether to reintroduce the carotid hold in the use of force policy, but the commission ultimately voted against that.

SEE RELATED: Police Commission passes use of force policy for SFPD

Following the passage of the new policy, the San Francisco Police Officers Association on Thursday announced the lawsuit to prevent the Police Commission from implementing the new policy, claiming it violates the San Francisco charter and state labor laws. The suit was filed Tuesday in San Francisco Superior Court against The City, Police Commission and Acting Chief Toney Chaplin.

“We’re a labor union and our members have a right to negotiate over working conditions,” Martin Halloran, the union’s president, said in a statement. “The commission wants to ignore those labor rights. The charter is clear that our dispute must go to arbitration, so we’re asking a judge to order the commission back to the table.”

SEE RELATED: New SFPD chief may already have fight on his hands with police union

The commission and union have been negotiating the policy since last summer. The commission declared an impasse Oct. 21.

According to Thursday’s statement, the police union is also pushing for the use of Tasers “to balance restrictions on force options in the new policy.”

The union also this week lamented its apparent exclusion from the selection process for a new police chief, which Mayor Ed Lee denies. The mayor on Tuesday announced William Scott, a deputy chief in Los Angeles, as The City’s new police chief. Scott will succeed Chaplin, who has held the post following former Chief Greg Suhr’s resignation in May.

Untitled-1

Read more criminal justice news on the Crime Ink page in print. Follow us on Twitter: @sfcrimeinkCrime

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott leaves the scene of an officer-involved shooting at Brannan Street and Jack London Alley in the South Park area on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Chief Scott issues rare apology to man shot by SF police

Officer says he ‘did not intend for his firearm to go off’

Despite the pandemic, San Francisco has ended the fiscal year with a budget surplus. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Better than expected tax revenues leave city with $157.3M surplus for this year

As the fiscal year nears an end and Mayor London Breed prepares… Continue reading

Passengers board a BART train bound for the San Francisco Airport at Powell Street station. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
BART bumps up service restoration to August 30, offers fare discounts

Rail agency breaks pandemic ridership records, prepares to welcome more passengers

Ashley and Michelle Monterrosa hold a photo of their brother Sean Monterrosa, who was killed by a Vallejo police officer early Tuesday morning, as they are comforted at a memorial rally at the 24th Street Mission BART plaza on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
State Department of Justice to investigate Sean Monterrosa shooting by Vallejo police

Attorney General Rob Bonta steps in after Solano County DA declines case

Gov. Gavin Newsom, show here speaking at the City College of San Francisco mass vaccination site in April, faces a recall election due to anger on the right over his handling of the pandemic, among other issues. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Why Gavin Newsom’s popularity could work against him in the recall election

Top pollster: ‘We’re not seeing the Democrats engaged in this election. And that may be a problem…’

Most Read