The main entrance of the San Francisco Police Officers Association, pictured Aug. 31, 2016. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

The main entrance of the San Francisco Police Officers Association, pictured Aug. 31, 2016. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

SFPD union sues city, Police Commission over use of force policy

San Francisco’s police union is going to court to try to stop the implementation of a use of force policy for officers that was passed Wednesday night by the Police Commission.

The new policy, perhaps most controversially, bans officers from shooting at moving vehicles in most instances as well as the use of the carotid hold. Late Wednesday at the commission meeting, it was debated whether to reintroduce the carotid hold in the use of force policy, but the commission ultimately voted against that.

SEE RELATED: Police Commission passes use of force policy for SFPD

Following the passage of the new policy, the San Francisco Police Officers Association on Thursday announced the lawsuit to prevent the Police Commission from implementing the new policy, claiming it violates the San Francisco charter and state labor laws. The suit was filed Tuesday in San Francisco Superior Court against The City, Police Commission and Acting Chief Toney Chaplin.

“We’re a labor union and our members have a right to negotiate over working conditions,” Martin Halloran, the union’s president, said in a statement. “The commission wants to ignore those labor rights. The charter is clear that our dispute must go to arbitration, so we’re asking a judge to order the commission back to the table.”

SEE RELATED: New SFPD chief may already have fight on his hands with police union

The commission and union have been negotiating the policy since last summer. The commission declared an impasse Oct. 21.

According to Thursday’s statement, the police union is also pushing for the use of Tasers “to balance restrictions on force options in the new policy.”

The union also this week lamented its apparent exclusion from the selection process for a new police chief, which Mayor Ed Lee denies. The mayor on Tuesday announced William Scott, a deputy chief in Los Angeles, as The City’s new police chief. Scott will succeed Chaplin, who has held the post following former Chief Greg Suhr’s resignation in May.

Untitled-1

Read more criminal justice news on the Crime Ink page in print. Follow us on Twitter: @sfcrimeinkCrime

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A sign about proposed development of the bluff at Thornton State Beach in Daly City on Friday, Feb. 26, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Retreat center proposed at popular state beach

Daly City residents oppose construction on ocean bluffs

Rev. Roland Gordon shows “The Great Cloud of Witnesses” collage mural at the Ingleside Presbyterian Church, which he began building in 1980.<ins> (</ins>
Rev. Roland Gordon preaches love in action

Pastor promotes peace, hope through art and prayer

San Francisco’s Buster Posey was back at the plate after sitting out last season due to the risk of COVID-19. (David Maialetti/Tribune News Service)
Giants struggle against Angels in first game of Spring Training

By Nick Zeller-Singh Nearly 1,000 fans gathered into a breezy Scottsdale Stadium… Continue reading

Basketball (Shutterstock)
SI alum Begovich gets his moment, but Stanford falls on Senior Day

MAPLES PAVILION — Generally speaking, Stanford’s home finale on Saturday afternoon, a… Continue reading

U.S. Attorney David Anderson announces federal firearms charges against two men for their roles in a March 2019 shooting outside the Fillmore Heritage Center in a news conference alongside SFPD staff at the Phillip Burton Federal Building on Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Departing U.S. attorney predicts corruption probe will continue

David Anderson shook up City Hall as top federal prosecutor

Most Read