An excerpt of the racist text messages filed in federal court (S.F. Examiner file photo)

An excerpt of the racist text messages filed in federal court (S.F. Examiner file photo)

SFPD officer implicated in racist text scandal charged with bank robbery

One of the San Francisco police officers embroiled in the racist text messaging scandal has been arrested and charged with allegedly robbing a bank in the Sunset, according to federal prosecutors.

Rain Olson Daugherty, 44, was arrested Tuesday for allegedly handing the teller at the East West Bank on Irving Street a note demanding cash on Nov. 29, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Daugherty, a 20-year veteran of the San Francisco Police Department, was charged with bank robbery Wednesday. He allegedly walked out the door with some $9,050 in cash.

The news comes after Daugherty filed a lawsuit in 2015 on behalf of himself and eight unnamed officers to block the SFPD from punishing them for sending racist and homophobic text messages.

The messages, which included jokes about burning crosses, were revealed during the federal corruption trial of former Sgt. Ian Furminger that stemmed from a joint investigation between the FBI and SFPD into police misconduct.

The officers initially won the lawsuit when a San Francisco Superior Court judge decided that then-Police Chief Greg Suhr had waited too long to pursue discipline, but an appeals court has since overturned the decision.

Some of the officers’ cases were finally heard behind closed doors at the Police Commission earlier this month, but it is unclear where Daugherty’s case stands because of state law sealing police disciplinary records from the public.

It has been reported that some of the officers face termination, while others have since decided to retire instead of facing discipline.

SEE RELATED: Years after racist text messaging scandal, SF police officers to face discipline

An FBI agent outlined the bank robbery case against Daugherty in an affidavit attached to the criminal complaint.

According to the FBI, Daugherty walked into the bank at 2219 Irving St. in the afternoon and showed the teller a note demanding cash in $50 and $100 bills.

“Calm down, just do it,” Daugherty said, the teller later told the FBI.

The teller handed over the cash as another pressed an alarm button.

Surveillance footage then showed the robber, wearing a plaid shirt and baseball cap without any sort of disguise, walk out.

Two internal affairs investigators with the SFPD identified Daugherty as the suspect after the SFPD circulated photographs from the surveillance footage within the department, according to the FBI.

The FBI identified the internal affairs investigators as Sgt. B. O’Connor, who worked with Daugherty at Mission Police Station, and Sgt. J. O’Bidi, who is assigned to a separate investigation into Daugherty.

Daugherty is facing an unrelated criminal investigation out of San Mateo County.

In July, prosecutors there charged him with felony theft from an elder and four counts misdemeanor possession of a controlled substance.

He bailed out of jail in that case for $100,000, according to court records.

The FBI said multiple witnesses identified Daugherty as the suspected robber in a photo lineup Dec. 6.

David Stevenson, a police spokesperson, said Daugherty was placed on unpaid status July 24 — the day the charges were filed in San Mateo.

The FBI said Daugherty was suspended without pay as a result of the San Mateo investigation.

Before his suspension, Daugherty earned $129,896 a year in base pay as an officer with the SFPD since 1998, according to city payroll records.

He is currently in federal custody and was scheduled to appear for arraignment Wednesday.

This story has been updated from earlier versions to include additional information and to amend the date police placed Daugherty on unpaid status based on corrected information from police.

mbarba@sfexaminer.com
Crime

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