SFO, food service workers avert strike

Holiday travelers will not have to fend for themselves when it comes to snacks, drinks and meals at San Francisco International Airport after representatives for the airport and the union representing its concession workers announced late Friday that a tentative agreement was reached with one company that runs restaurants there.

A two-week cooling-off period was requested by airport Director John Martin after Unite Here! Local 2 reached a tentative deal with Host, a company that runs four restaurants at the airport, according to union spokesman Ian Lewis.

The union represents about 650 employees — including cooks, waiters and other restaurant workers — at 50 food outlets within the airport.

Lewis said negotiations are not planned during the next two weeks and the union will move to reach the same deal with the remaining two dozen or so comapanies that run the remaining 44 food concession outlets in the airport.

Earlier Friday, chapter President Mike Casey said the all-day negotiations were the last chance and that the union would be at the bargaining table with airport officials “until we settle or we strike.”

Casey said that 97 percent of the workers he represents voted to authorize the strike.

Airport spokesman Mike McCarron said an estimated 1.6 million travelers are expected before the end of the year.

According to Casey, the agreement includes a nearly 33 percent increase in pensions and a nearly 10 percent increase in wages. The contract would be for two and a half years.

The workers have been without a contract since November.

jgoldman@examiner.com

Examiner Staff Writer Mike Billings contributed to this report.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Second grader Genesis Ulloa leads students in an after-school community hub in a game at the Mission YMCA on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF parents face school year with hope, trepidation and concern

‘Honestly, I don’t know how I’m going to deal with it’

Health care workers in the intensive care unit at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, with Alejandro Balderas, a 44-year-old patient who later died. Even in California, a state with a coronavirus vaccination rate well above average, the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 has nearly doubled in the past two weeks, according to a New York Times database. (Isadora Kosofsky/The New York Times)
Why COVID took off in California, again

‘The good news is: The vaccines are working’

Lake Oroville stood at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
A kayaker on the water at Lake Oroville, which stands at 33 percent full and 40 percent of historical average when this photograph was taken on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 in Oroville, Calif. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times via Tribune News Service)
Facing ‘dire water shortages,’ California bans Delta pumping

By Rachel Becker CalMatters In an aggressive move to address “immediate and… Continue reading

Most Read