SF voters shut down Mission moratorium

Market-rate developments in the Mission district will proceed as planned after an effort to pause such projects failed Tuesday at the ballot box.

Proposition I, which would have imposed an 18-month moratorium on market-rate housing in the Mission district that’s widely considered ground zero for The City’s housing crisis, appears to have lost with 57 percent of voters rejecting the moratorium.

There are about 24 projects with about 1,220 units of housing in the pipeline in the Mission. City Controller Ben Rosenfield estimated the moratorium could have delayed some 85 units up to 18 months.

Proponents of the moratorium, which was first introduced by Supervisor David Campos over the summer but ultimately failed to garner enough votes at the board, argued that market-rate development is driving out longtime residents of the Mission, who can no longer afford to live in the neighborhood.

According to Planning Department data, more than 900 low- and moderate-income families have left the Mission in the past five years, including through evictions and displacement.

Opponents of the measure argued that a temporary moratorium on building market-rate housing in the Mission would drive up housing costs citywide and would not prevent the displacement of current residents.

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