Ezekiel Logan, a 96-year-old World War II Navy veteran, prepares to receive a COVID-19 vaccination from Kaiser nurse Jamie Rant at the opening of the COVID-19 mass vaccination site at Moscone Center on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Ezekiel Logan, a 96-year-old World War II Navy veteran, prepares to receive a COVID-19 vaccination from Kaiser nurse Jamie Rant at the opening of the COVID-19 mass vaccination site at Moscone Center on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

SF to pause COVID-19 vaccinations at two mass sites as supplies run out

San Francisco’s two high-volume vaccination sites will temporarily cease operations Monday due to a lack of vaccine supply.

City officials have previously blamed a shortage of vaccine supply and its unpredictable delivery as the primary cause for a slower than hoped for rollout of vaccinating people against COVID-19. However, this is the first time they have had to announce a suspension of vaccinations at these two recently opened sites, Moscone Center and City College of San Francisco.

“I’m frustrated because we’ve shown that SF can administer shots as soon as they come in,” Mayor London Breed wrote on Twitter Sunday. “CCSF has been running well for weeks. The reports from Moscone are overwhelmingly positive. The only thing holding us back is a lack of supply, and I’m hoping that will change soon.”

Moscone Center will “pause for one week and will reopen once supply is sufficient to resume operations,” city officials announced Sunday. The site is being operated by Kaiser Permanente and a consortium of other health care providers.

The City College site, run by UCSF in partnership with The City, is expected to resume activity on Friday, but only to administer second doses.

“The vaccine supply coming to San Francisco’s healthcare providers and the Department of Public Health (DPH) is limited, inconsistent, and unpredictable, making vaccine roll out difficult and denying San Franciscans this potentially life-saving intervention,” city officials said in a statement.

The City still plans to move forward with opening a third mass vaccination site in the Bayview this week at the SF Produce Market, but “with available appointments far below full capacity.”

City officials said that “no existing appointments were canceled; spots are only released for booking once the vaccine supply is confirmed.”

As of Saturday, 118,120 San Francisco residents have received their first dose of the vaccine, about 15 percent of the population over the age of 16, while 33,639 have received their second dose. City officials said they had vaccinated 47 percent of residents aged 65 and older.

Breed announced last week The City would expand the pool of those eligible for the vaccine on Feb. 24 to teachers, child care workers, first responders like police officers and food workers, including those working at grocery stores and restaurants.

The vaccine setback comes amid concerns about more contagious variants of COVID-19. California’s first two cases of the South African variant were identified last week, both in the Bay Area.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCoronavirussan francisco newsVaccines

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