SF State professor wins award

Martin Linder, San Francisco State University associate professor of design and industry, recently won a Nightingale Award for his innovative Florabella lounge chair, which has special features that curb hospital-borne illnesses.

How did this project start? We were asked to come in and take a look at the waiting-room environment of different medical facilities. We went into UCSF, Kaiser and some other Bay Area health care facilities. We interviewed people that worked in the facilities and talked to the people who sat in the chairs. After about seven months, we started to identify the problems.

What did you find? In these environments, there are a lot of cracks where dirt and grime get in there. And the furniture not only breaks down over time, but it’s a health risk as well. Also, the chairs were very stiff and people would be slouching and sleeping, but they wouldn’t be comfortable. We also wanted the chair to help the patients alleviate the stress of going to the hospital, so we designed a chair that sort of hugs the patient.

How does the “floating design” work? The floating design — the seat’s not really connected to the arms — allowed for dirt and debris to drop to the floor instead of collecting in the creases of the chair.

How are budget cuts at SFSU affecting your department? It’s making a major difference in every department. There are no lecturers anymore, so the professors are teaching all the required classes now.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Jill Bonny, owner of Studio Kazoku tattoo parlor in the Haight, tattoos client Lam Vo on Friday, March 5, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
No one was fighting for tattoo artists, so they started advocating for themselves

Jill Bonny has been tattooing in the Bay Area since 2000. Four… Continue reading

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted changes to The City's streets including Slow Streets closures to increase open space access and the Shared Spaces program, which allows businesses to use public right-of-ways for dining, retail and services. (Examiner illustration)
COVID is reshaping the streets of San Francisco

Walk down Page Street, which is closed to thru-traffic, and you might… Continue reading

At a rally in February, Monthanus Ratanapakdee, left, and Eric Lawson remember Vicha Ratanapakdee, an 84-year-old Thai man who died after he was pushed to the pavement in San Francisco. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/Examiner file photo)
The criminal justice system can’t fix what’s wrong in our community

My 87-year-old mother walks gingerly, slowly, deliberately, one step in front of… Continue reading

Superintendent Vincent Matthews said some students and families who want to return will not be able to do so at this time. “We truly wish we could reopen schools for everyone,” he said. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFUSD sets April reopening date after reaching tentative agreement with teachers union

San Francisco Unified School District has set April 12 as its reopening… Continue reading

José Victor Luna and Maria Anabella Ochoa, who cite health reasons for continuing distance learning, say they have been enjoying walking in Golden Gate Park with their daughters Jazmin, a first grader, and Jessica, a third grader. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Some SFUSD families prefer distance learning

Health issues, classroom uncertainties among reasons for staying home

Most Read