SF State president announces retirement

Courtesy photoLeslie Wong

Courtesy photoLeslie Wong

San Francisco State University President Leslie Wong announced Monday that he is retiring at the end of this academic year.

Wong, SFSU’s 13th-ever president, was appointed to the position in 2012 and his retirement is effective July 30, 2019, according to the university.

“It has been an honor to serve with such a talented and committed community of students, faculty, staff, alumni and donors who have achieved so much and have helped shape the university in immeasurable and positive ways,” Wong said in a statement.

According to the university, Wong launched SFSU’s first comprehensive fundraising campaign and helped expand its alumni relations programs both nationally and abroad.

California State University Chancellor Timothy White said in a statement that under Wong’s leadership, SFSU “has made remarkable progress in improving student success with graduation rates reaching all-time highs.”

CSU officials will soon be launching a national search for a new president, and campus and community input will be sought at a later date.

-By Dan McMenamin, Bay City Newseducation

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